WYSO

Gun Laws

Democratic state senators had lots of questions for the sponsor of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun violence bill at its first hearing.

A quarter of the Ohio House – all Republicans – have signed on to a new “stand your ground” self-defense bill introduced last week.

The group that’s collecting petition signatures to ask voters if the state should require universal background checks on gun sales says it plans to move full steam ahead. And the effort is getting a boost from the leader of Dayton where a mass shooting in August left 10 dead, including the gunman.

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s confident his STRONG Ohio gun violence package will be enacted into law, in spite of the chilly reception he’s gotten from both Republicans and Democrats.

Two months and a day after Gov. Mike DeWine announced he was working on a plan to address gun violence after a mass shooting in Dayton, he’s unveiled a bill that he says lawmakers will approve.

Gov. Mike DeWine plans to reveal on Monday the official bill language on expanded background checks and red-flag gun confiscation, two major issues that have been at the center of heated debate in the aftermath of the Dayton mass shooting. 

A pair of House Republicans are pushing for a bill that would mandate better reporting into the database used for background checks on gun sales. They say it's an important step in addressing gun violence.

It’s been almost two months since Gov. Mike DeWine proposed a package of gun law and mental health policy changes, and he says lawmakers will soon look over his official language on that. 

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) says Gov. Mike DeWine's proposed gun regulations, which include expanded background checks and a version of the "Red Flag Law," will be "well vetted" by the Republican caucus.

Ohio Statehouse
Friscocali / Flickr Creative Commons

Last month, two teenage boys were shot and killed inside a Dayton garage by a homeowner who says they trespassed on the property. No charges have been filed. Now, the shooting’s raising questions about how Ohio prosecutes self-defense cases.

State lawmakers recently pushed a so-called Stand Your Ground measure that would have protected people who use lethal force if they believe their lives are at risk. That proposal failed to pass.

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