WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley

I-75 north of Cincinnati. Many in the Dayton area are living further from jobs than they did in the year 2000.   highway
Travis Estell / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is vowing to fight a provision in the new two-year state transportation budget that would penalize cities for the use of red-light traffic cameras. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine Wednesday signed the bill, which also raises Ohio’s gas tax to fund road and bridge infrastructure repairs.

The transportation budget requires cities that operate red-light cameras to report any fines the cameras generate, and for the state to deduct that income from their state aid allocations.

The city reported roughly $1.9 million in revenue from its camera program 2018.

Courthouse Square Downtown Dayton Partnership
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is advising city officials not to hold any counter-protests when a KKK-affiliated group assembles on Dayton’s Courthouse Square on May 25th.

The representative from Ohio's 10th district says he issued his request in a letter Wednesday sent to Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley. At least one such protest has been announced by a coalition that includes seven grassroots and faith-based organizations, and city commissioners are expected to discuss their options at a public meeting Wednesday night.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivers her 2019 State of the City Address at City Hall.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivered her State of the City Address on Wednesday morning - her sixth since taking office. The mayor’s speech tackled some of the difficult issues facing the city in the coming year.

Whaley’s more than 20-minute address began with some positives for the city. She outlined milestones reached by the city in education,business, downtown revitalization, and neighborhood investment. The mayor also talked about some of the challenges. These included the opioid crisis and the recent loss of Good Samaritan Hospital.

Street Lights
Gabriel Caparó / Flickr Creative Commons

The city of Dayton recently announced a new program designed to reduce demand for prostitution with 21st century tools. The initiative uses digital technology and social media to target people convicted of trying to buy sex. The new campaign is called the Buyer's Remorse initiative.

Officials say it modernizes the city’s longstanding practice of publishing the names and home addresses of people convicted of trying to hire prostitutes.

Under the new program, the city will now publish that information online on a newly created website: buyersremorsecampaign.com.

hospital room at the Medical Center at Elizabeth Place
https://www.facebook.com/The-Medical-Center-At-Elizabeth-Place-168343743181888/

Another Dayton medical center is at risk of closing following a decision by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to remove it from the federal program.

The Medical Center at Elizabeth Place (MCEP) has been operating at the former St. Elizabeth hospital site since 2006. The physician owned facility has 12 private, inpatient rooms, five operating rooms, an imaging center, and on site urgent care among other services.

Activists protest Dayton's pedestrian safety ordinance at city commission meeting held May 23.
April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

Dayton City Commissioners Wednesday voted to approve an ordinance banning panhandling along several busy roadways within city limits
April Laissle / WYSO

Dayton City Commissioners unanimously passed an ordinance effectively banning panhandling along many major roadways in Dayton. 

The new law prohibits pedestrians from coming within three feet of an operating vehicle on 51 busy roadways in the city. It would also penalize motorists who slow down or deviate from traffic lanes to interact with pedestrians.

Dayton Public Schools
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley celebrated the announcement Friday that Acting Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has reached a tentative contract agreement with the legal counsel of Dayton Public Schools.

Lolli assumed the superintendent post after former schools superintendent Rhonda Corr’s departure in November, 2017.

The late Friday announcement follows another momentous DPS announcement earlier this week.

In her State of the City address earlier this month, Mayor Nan Whaley called health care a priority for the city. The recently announced closure of Good Samaritan Hospital was a key issue in the mayor’s speech.

 

Now, officials with Five Rivers Health Centers say they hope to expand services at an existing clinic to treat more patients affected by the loss of Good Sam. The health center was founded in 2011 and currently operates at nine locations in the Dayton Area.

 

mcohio.org

Longtime Dayton public servant Willis E. Blackshear has died. He served in the Montgomery County treasurer’s office for 22 years, and as county recorder since 2008.

 

The 57-year-old Dayton native and graduate of Paul Laurence Dunbar High School died in hospice care on Monday. He was diagnosed with cancer nine months ago, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley told WYSO.

 

She says Blackshear really understood the value of public service.

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