WYSO

Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Ohio’s casinos have been closed for almost two weeks and it's been a week since bars were shut down, including those offering Keno. But Ohio Lottery tickets are still being sold, even under the new “Stay at Home” order that goes into effect tonight.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is ordering abortion clinics to stop all non-essential procedures. Those facilities are fighting back, saying their services are essential.


Ohioans who need to renew their driver’s license or tags are going to have to wait. So will people want to get their hair cut or get a tattoo. Those businesses are the latest places ordered to close because of the coronavirus outbreak.

When businesses shut down or lay off employees, they are required to give a notice to the feds and the state. A change intended to make that process easier is being made because of the coronavirus pandemic.


Health clubs and entertainment facilities have been ordered to shut down at the close of business Monday because of concerns about the spread of coronavirus. 

Ohio’s K-12 schools should be gearing up to take state mandated tests during the first week of April. But there’s no guarantee the schools will be back in session by that point if the coronavirus situation isn’t under control by then. Those tests might not happen.

Congress is considering a bill that would make it easier for low-income people to get emergency food assistance during the COVID-19 outbreak. And advocates for foodbanks are requesting the state and communities make some changes too.

Gov. Mike DeWine says he thinks the state’s Coronavirus hotline needs to be moved to a larger location because the tight space it is located in now is conducive to passing the potentially deadly disease. The hotline is getting an average of two calls per minute. 

A task force studying the use of facial recognition for law enforcement found no wrongdoing in the way the state was handling that system. And an upgrade and expansion of the system is now likely.

A bi-partisan bill would ban Ohio children under 18 from participating in so-called conversion therapy, the practice of trying to convert someone from gay to straight. 

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