WYSO

Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Nearly 75,000 Ohioans have registered with the state to receive medical marijuana. Of those, just over 51,000 have actually purchased the product. Those involved with the program propose some changes they say will improve it for everyone.

Federal law mandates insurers treat mental health services like they would physical health care. But the sponsors of a new bill in the Ohio Legislature say that’s not happening. 

Opponents of the death penalty say they are concerned about a newly proposed abortion ban that could charge a woman who gets an abortion and a doctor who provides it with a capital crime. It would make abortion punishable by life in prison without the possibility of parole or death. 

The head of the Ohio House wants the state to come up with a new way of funding schools. And he throws out a suggestion that could involve what's often been called a "Robin Hood" approach.

A new bill that would ban abortions in Ohio has been introduced by Statehouse Republicans.  A similar total ban bill was introduced last year didn’t pass. So why is this bill being introduced now? 

A new bill outlaws all abortions and subjects medical professionals who facilitate in the procedure to possible murder charges.

The Ohio Department of Health has granted a license to Women’s Med Center of Dayton, saving it from closure after years of legal battles. That health clinic is the last abortion provider in the Dayton area.

Ohio law permits pharmacists to give the overdose drug Naloxone without a prescription to people who deal with opioid addicts. But one state lawmaker says many pharmacists are not doing that.

The Ohio Senate has passed and sent two controversial abortion bills to the Ohio House. One involves abortion reversal, a practice that is not backed by mainstream medical professionals. That other subjects doctors to steep penalties for failing to deal with aborted remains in a particular way. 

Disabled Ohioans are limited on how much they can earn or save and still be eligible for Social Security or Medicaid. But special savings accounts through Ohio’s Treasurer office that will allow them to save without losing benefits are gaining in popularity.

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