WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley

Protesters call for stricter gun laws near the site of President Donald Trump's recent visit to Dayton.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says he’s moving forward with efforts to tighten gun regulations in the state. 

The Republican appeared in Dayton Thursday with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley in the Oregon District.

Speaking near the site of a makeshift memorial to the nine people killed, and more than 30 others injured in Sunday’s shooting outside Ned Peppers Bar, Whaley told reporters she's focusing on helping her grieving city heal, and assisting Oregon District shop owners return to business as usual.  

April Laissle / WYSO

Tensions were high at the site of the Oregon District shooting Wednesday morning, where a crowd of about 150 people waited for President Donald Trump’s arrival in Dayton.

Screaming matches broke out just steps away from flowers memorializing the nine people who were killed by a lone gunman Sunday.

Police, occupied by the president’s visit to a nearby hospital, were initially not at the scene.

Before officers arrived to calm the melee, City Commissioner Chris Shaw tried to de-escalate the conflict on his own by standing between the two groups.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

President Trump visited survivors of the shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on Wednesday before heading to El Paso, Texas, the site of the weekend's other deadly violence. Trump remained out of public view during the Dayton stop.

On the ground in El Paso, Trump said, "We had an amazing day."

"The love, the respect, for the office of the presidency, it was — I wish you could have been in there to see it," he told reporters.

oregon district, ned peppers
Jess Mador / WYSO

Law enforcement authorities say the shooter in the Oregon District attack had a history of obsession with violence and had expressed a previous desire to commit a mass shooting.

Dayton Police announced Tuesday the Federal Bureau of Investigation is taking over the investigation into the 24-year-old killer’s motives in the attack that left nine people dead and more than two dozen others injured.

At a press conference, an FBI special agent from the Cincinnati Field Office told reporters there’s still a lot of evidence to go through. 

Congressman Mike Turner (R-Ohio)
Office of Mike Turner

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is backing restrictions on sales of military style weapons in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Dayton. 

He'll also support magazine capacity limits and red flag laws that bar potentially dangerous individuals from owning guns.

Celina Mayor Jeffrey Hazel, Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio First Lady address the media the morning after an EF3 tornado killed one resident and left 40 with uninhabitable homes.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The 10 Ohio counties impacted by the Memorial Day tornado outbreak are now eligible for federal disaster recovery aid. Dayton-area officials say the FEMA and other funding could play a crucial role in the Miami Valley’s ongoing recovery.

President Donald Trump issued a federal disaster declaration Tuesday, one week after Gov. Mike DeWine formally requested it.

The declaration means affected Ohioans are now eligible for aid through FEMA’s individual assistance, hazard mitigation, and disaster legal services programs.

Jerry Kenney

United States Sen. Sherrod Brown is requesting federal funds to help Dayton recover some of the city's costs associated with security for the May 25 Klan rally. In a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, Brown wrote the city spent more than $650,000 to ensure the safety and security of people and property during, "the potentially volatile event.”

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says that while the city did not ask Brown to make the request, she's thankful for the help.

Police officers in riot gear stand on Third Street as a small Indiana Klan group rallied in Courthouse Square Saturday.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A rally by an Indiana Ku Klux Klan group in Dayton’s Courthouse Square resulted in no major problems or violence Saturday. The event drew hundreds of police officers from across the Miami Valley and the state of Ohio, and crowds of counterdemonstrators, who flooded downtown Dayton to protest the KKK.

The protestors vastly outnumbered the nine Klan members who had traveled more than 100 miles from Indiana to rally inside a fenced-off plaza in Dayton’s Courthouse Square.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission is urging Dayton’s two major health-care systems to sign a transfer agreement with the Miami Valley’s last-remaining abortion provider.

The agreement is required by state law. And without it, the clinic is in danger of closing.

Among the city commission members, four out of five voted in favor of the resolution asking Kettering Health Network and Premier Health to sign the transfer agreement with Women’s Med Center in Kettering.

Legal efforts to challenge the state requirement have so far been unsuccessful.

April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton Commission held its first meeting Wednesday, one day after federal law enforcement officials revealed a major investigation into alleged fraud and public corruption in the city’s government. The probe is related to the city’s handling of public contracts.

At the commission meeting, Dayton officials announced they’re launching their own separate internal investigation into the federal allegations. 

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