WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley

Dozens of DPS students and parents from across the  district attended the town hall, where students posed questions about issues including school violence, lack of parental involvement and after-school activities to district and city officials.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

At a student-organized “Youth Town Hall” Thursday night, Dayton Public Schools students voiced their concerns about the district.

The event at Thurgood Marshall High School gave students a chance to question a panel of school administrators and elected officials that included Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley.

Students, parents, and community members filled an assembly hall but only students were allowed to address the panel.

Jeff Pedro of Sim-Trainer.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Roughly two weeks after Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled the language of his gun control legislation, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up their rhetoric. DeWine’s bill differs from the 17-point plan he released in the aftermath of the deadly Aug. 4 mass shooting in the Oregon District, and that’s sparking some advocates to recalibrate their opinions. 

The group that’s collecting petition signatures to ask voters if the state should require universal background checks on gun sales says it plans to move full steam ahead. And the effort is getting a boost from the leader of Dayton where a mass shooting in August left 10 dead, including the gunman.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley
WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

Mayor Nan Whaley testified before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Assault Weapons.
WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley testified on Capitol Hill Wednesday in support of stricter gun controls.

Speaking before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Assault Weapons, Whaley called on lawmakers to take assault weapons off the streets to stop shootings similar to the one in the city’s Oregon District that left nine people dead and nearly three dozen others injured.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley speaking to reporters near the site of the shooting rampage.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley joined a group of Congressional Democrats in Washington Monday to lobby for tighter gun regulations. The group that included Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer is calling for passage of a bill to expand background checks for gun purchases.

The bipartisan proposal known as H.R.8 would expand background checks to cover private firearm sales.

Mayor Whaley urged the Senate to bring the House bill to a vote.

2019 Memorial Day Tornado
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, United States Small Business Administration and the city of Dayton are urging people affected by the Memorial Day tornadoes to apply for federal disaster assistance. The filing deadline is Tuesday September 3, 2019.

James Joseph, the regional administrator with the FEMA, says more than 6,000 people have already signed up for FEMA or SBA assistance.

Mayors are actively lobbying state lawmakers to consider a package of changes to gun laws and mental health policy unveiled by Gov. Mike DeWine in the wake of the Dayton mass shooting earlier this month.

Dayton Strong memorial in front of Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District.
April Laissle / WYSO

The city of Dayton has announced the members of a new committee tasked with helping to oversee the location and design for a permanent memorial to the victims of the Oregon District shooting rampage, which killed nine people and injured more than 30 others in a matter of seconds outside the Ned Peppers bar.

The last thing that Nan Whaley, the Democratic mayor of Dayton, wants to hear in the wake of the tragedy that rocked her city on the early morning of Aug. 4 is the usual partisan bickering and excuses by politicians who are in the pocket of special interests.

She doesn't want to hear it.

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