WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley

Leila Goldstein / WYSO

Following nationwide protests of police brutality against Black people, local governments across the country are reevaluating police practices. In Dayton, the city commission has launched five working groups to address police reform which will begin meeting this month. But some local leaders who have worked on these issues for years question whether the new plan will lead to real change. 

States and cities rely on business-generated tax revenue to help pay for employees delivering public services, like sanitation workers, first responders, health and safety workers, and librarians.

Until recently, that is.

In the six weeks since the coronavirus pandemic began ravaging U.S. businesses, more than 30 million Americans have filed for unemployment.

And with businesses tanking, many local governments are running out of money to pay for those public services.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley speaking to reporters near the site of the shooting rampage.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is calling for more federal aid to help the nation's smaller cities weather the coronavirus crisis.  Whaley is among a group of United States mayors who represent cities with fewer than half a million residents, who say the financial impacts of the pandemic could lead to widespread service reductions down the road.

A screenshot of Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley's press conference, streamed live on Facebook.
City of Dayton

The KKK-affiliated, Indiana-based hate group that rallied in Dayton last year has applied for a permit to do it again.

Last year, nine members of the Honorable Sacred Knights of Indiana rallied in downtown Dayton. They were armed and wore masks. They were met downtown by hundreds of police officers and counter-protestors. That event ended peacefully.

However, officials are concerned that the timing of this year’s rally could signal far greater trouble as the group’s application is for September 5, just weeks before Election Day.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley giving her 2020 State of the City address. She complimented residents for their response to a string of tragic events in the past year.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivered her State of the City Address Wednesday morning. Over the course of a half hour, Whaley made numerous references to the tribulations of 2019 — the KKK rally, Memorial Day Tornadoes, and the mass shooting that left nine dead. Yet, much of the mayor’s focus was on what Daytonians have accomplished together.

Last year in her State of the City address Mayor Whaley said Dayton had some tough issues to address — disparities in opportunity among neighborhoods, and the need for more investment in the city’s west side.

Dayton Daily News new building in 2007
Becker1999 / Flickr Creative Commons

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is criticizing a recent Federal Communications Commission decision approving the more than $3 billion acquisition of Cox Media by a private equity firm.

In an editorial in USA Today Thursday, Whaley and Michael Copps, a former FCC commissioner, say the deal paves the way for Dayton to lose its daily newspaper, a move proposed by the company Apollo Global Management last fall.

Dozens of DPS students and parents from across the  district attended the town hall, where students posed questions about issues including school violence, lack of parental involvement and after-school activities to district and city officials.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

At a student-organized “Youth Town Hall” Thursday night, Dayton Public Schools students voiced their concerns about the district.

The event at Thurgood Marshall High School gave students a chance to question a panel of school administrators and elected officials that included Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley.

Students, parents, and community members filled an assembly hall but only students were allowed to address the panel.

Jeff Pedro of Sim-Trainer.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Roughly two weeks after Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled the language of his gun control legislation, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up their rhetoric. DeWine’s bill differs from the 17-point plan he released in the aftermath of the deadly Aug. 4 mass shooting in the Oregon District, and that’s sparking some advocates to recalibrate their opinions. 

The group that’s collecting petition signatures to ask voters if the state should require universal background checks on gun sales says it plans to move full steam ahead. And the effort is getting a boost from the leader of Dayton where a mass shooting in August left 10 dead, including the gunman.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley
WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

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