WYSO

Associated Press

Ohio's largest Roman Catholic diocese plans to release a list of priests who have been removed from their posts because of sexual abuse and misconduct allegations.

The Diocese of Cleveland is now the fourth of six in the state to say it will publish a list of priests following a Pennsylvania grand jury report outlined details of sexual abuse allegations.

The Cleveland diocese said Tuesday it will release the names of abusive priests, even if they are now dead.

Another Roman Catholic diocese in Ohio plans to make public the names of priests who have been accused of sexual abuse.

The Catholic Diocese of Columbus said Wednesday it intends to release a list within the next few months that will include priests who've been credibly accused of abuse, both living or dead.

The diocese says in a statement that the diocese understands it's an important step to restore confidence in the church and its clergy.

James Lee / Flickr Creative Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union is asking another Ohio city to repeal a law that makes panhandling a minor criminal offense.

At issue is an ordinance in Chillicothe in southern Ohio that addresses "suspicious persons" and which prohibits soliciting donations by an individual.

The Chillicothe Gazette reported Wednesday that the ACLU asked the city in a letter last month to overturn the law. The civil rights group pointed to U.S. Supreme Court rulings that say requests for monetary contributions are protected speech.

Jerry Kenney

The nation's largest grocery chain has begun to phase out the use of plastic bags as more Americans grow uncomfortable with their impact on the environment.

Kroger Co. will start Thursday at its QFC stores in and around Seattle, with the goal of using no plastic bags at those stores at some point next year. The company said it will be plastic-bag free at all of its nearly 2,800 stores by 2025.

CareSource is headquartered in Dayton, Ohio medicaid affordable care act
Joshua Chenault / WYSO

Ohio's largest Medicaid plan says the amount of opioids prescribed to its members has decreased 40 percent over the past 18 months.

CareSource announced Monday it plans to reduce that number by 50 percent by the end of this year.

The Dayton-based organization privately manages 1.8 million Medicaid plans. It says it notifies providers who prescribe a large amount of opioids to members, and can identify members at risk for substance misuse.

Flickr Creative Commons User Adam Kiefaber

The sheriff of Butler County has taken out a billboard ad criticizing a local district's school security.

The Hamilton-Middletown Journal-News reports the ad by Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones questions the safety provided by the Hamilton school board.

Jones says the board isn't transparent and doesn't "talk to the public." Former Hamilton City Schools Superintendent Tony Orr agreed to a separation agreement in April that was based on an unreleased report into claims he broke district policies.

(Creative Commons/www.wildretina.com)

American Airlines says it has quote "stabilized" a computer system that failed at its Dayton-based affiliate carrier, causing the cancellation of 2,500 flights over the past week.

 The failure occurred in computers used to schedule crews for Dayton’s PSA Airlines, which is owned by American and operates many American Eagle regional flights.

A spokesperson said PSA stabilized the computer systems Tuesday morning, but that there would be some additional cancellations Wednesday as the airline repositioned planes and crews.

Clark State Community College

Clark State Community College will offer its first four-year degree starting next year.

 The college in Springfield announced recently that it has received state approval to offer a bachelor's degree in manufacturing technology management.

Clark State President Jo Alice Blondin says the program will allow people currently working in the manufacturing industry to learn new skills and prepare for advancement.

warrantedarrest / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio has licensed 56 locations that can sell medical marijuana once it becomes legal this fall.

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy on Monday awarded those provisional dispensary licenses that give the stores six months to meet state operation requirements. A total of 376 applications were received.

The executive director of the National Cannabis Industry Association of Ohio, Thomas Rosenberger, says the board has ended months of speculation about where patients will be able to get medical marijuana.

Keith Allison / Flickr

U.S. immigration agents have made more than 100 arrests at an Ohio gardening company in the Trump administration's growing crackdown on employers for hiring people who are in the country illegally.

 The 114 arrests happened Tuesday morning at two locations of Corso's Flower & Garden Center, one in Sandusky and another in nearby Castalia. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says it expects charges for crimes including identity theft and tax evasion.

No criminal charges have been filed against Corso's, but authorities say the employer is under investigation.

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