WYSO

Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Fire truck with ladder
Charles Edward Miller / Flickr Creative Commons

Dayton voters Tuesday overwhelmingly approved Issue 15. The charter amendment clears the way for city firefighters to volunteer in other communities, something the city charter had barred. 

The ballot measure was proposed by Dayton City Commissioners Matt Joseph and Chris Shaw. Shaw says the rule change is needed to allow the city to compete for federal firefighting grants.

voting, elections, vote, election
Jess Mador / WYSO

Voting is underway in communities across the Miami Valley this Election Day. In Greene County, elections officials reported light turnout and no major issues with the county’s new voting machines.

Llyn McCoy, director of the Greene County Board of Elections, said precinct officials ironed out some minor issues with the new voting equipment, which combine paper and computer voting and finish by printing each voter's completed ballot. 

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Tuesday, Nov. 5 is Election Day. Among the races on the ballot in Greene County is a crowded slate for Yellow Springs Village Council, with five candidates vying for three open seats. 

The election for Yellow Springs Mayor is also on the ballot but the race this year is not competitive. 

Under Yellow Springs Village Council elections rules, the two candidates who receive the most votes are elected to four-year terms, and the candidate who receives the third-highest vote total wins a two-year term.

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Among the issues on the Nov. 5 ballot is a proposal to lower the voting age in Yellow Springs. Under Yellow Springs Issue 13, residents as young as 16 would be eligible to participate in local elections.

The all-or-nothing ballot issue amending the village charter would also extend the village mayor’s term from two years to four years beginning in 2021, doubling the term mayors can remain in office, and allow immigrants with green cards or other legal United States residency to vote on village issues. 

Fire truck with ladder
Charles Edward Miller / Flickr Creative Commons

Election Day is next week and this year Dayton voters will consider a measure allowing city firefighters to volunteer in other communities.

The city charter currently bars city employees from working for other jurisdictions.

Issue 15 was proposed by Dayton City Commissioners Matt Joseph and Chris Shaw.

Shaw says the rule change is needed to allow the city to compete for federal firefighting grants.

Federal law enforcement authorities announced first wave of charges in the ongoing probe in April.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Federal law enforcement officials have unsealed additional fraud charges in an ongoing public corruption investigation. The first wave of charges in the far-reaching probe were announced back in April.

On Tuesday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the United States Attorney’s office charged three people:

Wright State President Cheryl Schrader is set to retire Dec. 31. Sue Edwards
Jess Mador / WYSO

In January, Wright State Provost Sue Edwards will officially become the university’s next president. The Board of Trustees voted unanimously in favor of Edwards assuming the post over the weekend.

She’ll succeed President Cheryl Schrader, who’s set to retire Dec. 31.

A spokesman for the university says information on next steps for the Board and Edwards to work out details of her contract are expected soon.

Wright State university
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University has confirmed Provost and Executive Vice President Sue Edwards is assuming some presidential duties after current president Cheryl Schrader’s departure announcement last week.

Schrader plans to vacate her position at the end of this year, more than two years into her five-year contract, and Edwards takes the helm amid ongoing student enrollment challenges for Wright State.

Mattresses line up at a loading dock. Volunteers continue furniture deliveries to families displaced by the Memorial Day Tornadoes.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Nearly six months after the Memorial Day tornadoes, many residents in the hardest-hit communities continue to recover. More than 4,000 Montgomery County properties suffered damage in the storm and many survivors remain in temporary housing.

Of the hundreds of tornado-affected people who signed up for emergency replacement furniture from the nonprofit St. Vincent de Paul, more than 150 are still waiting for furniture assistance.

And, says Steve Bowen, that number is an undercount.

National Park Service officials say a copper reproduction bust of Wright Brother Orville Wright was spotted in some beach dunes.
National Park Service / National Park Service

A statue bust of Wright Brother Orville Wright has been recovered just hours after it was stolen from the Wright Brothers National Memorial in North Carolina.

An investigation by National Park Service Rangers continues into the vandalism, which also left the statue’s 300-pound granite mounting base toppled over and damaged.

National Park Service staff discovered the recent vandalism to the approximately 40-pound copper reproduction bust and its base in the early hours of  October 13 and sent out an alert seeking tips from the public.  

Pages