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WYSO Morning News Update: New study shows majority of Ohio women cannot get abortions

Rally for Abortion Justice March for Women 2021 Columbus
Paul Becker
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Wikimedia Creative Commons

Your WYSO Morning News Update for July 22, 2022:

  • Ohio’s “Conscience Clause” and abortion
    (Statehouse News Bureau) - Ohio’s new abortion law bans the procedure after about six weeks when fetal heart activity can be detected. But it isn’t the only law under which abortion can be denied. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports the current budget includes a provision that could also come into play.
  • Body of Woman Found in Great Miami Identified
    (WYSO) - A body found in the Great Miami River last week has been identified as 40-year-old Triena Wolford. She was identified by her sister. Authorities are still investigating the nature of the death, saying it’s unclear how she died.
  • DPS Scores
    (WYSO) - Dayton Public Schools is returning to pre-pandemic levels of academic achievement. That’s according to its latest internal testing. The largest gains were seen in kindergarten through third grade.
  • River drownings
    (WYSO) - Three people have drowned in local rivers this month. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources says people really shouldn't swim in rivers. And if you do, you should wear a life jacket. WYSO Environmental Reporter Chris Welter explains why.

  • New OSU study shows 89% of Ohio women cannot get abortions here
    (Statehouse News Bureau) - A study shows nearly nine out of ten people who got abortions in Ohio in the past couple of years wouldn’t be able to get them now. Ohio’s new law bans abortion at the point fetal activity can be detected, around six weeks into a pregnancy. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.
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