WYSO

2019 Oregon District Shooting

Dayton Strong memorial in front of Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District.
April Laissle / WYSO

State Attorney General Dave Yost is calling for the release of the Oregon District mass shooter’s Bellbrook-Sugarcreek student records. 

Yost filed a so-called “friend-of-the-court” brief in the Ohio Supreme Court asking it to overturn an earlier lower-court decision to keep the records private.

Yost’s brief supports a coalition of news outlets that includes Cox Media Group, Scripps, WDTN, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Associated Press, The New York Times, CNN and ABC News that is suing to make the records public. 

Dayton, Ohio, is a city that is used to getting knocked flat on its back.

The Bridges family drove over an hour to place nine teddy bears on the memorial in the Oregon District, one for each of the victims who lost their lives.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

More than four dozen people affected by the Dayton mass shooting have received a monetary gift from the Oregon District Tragedy Fund. The Dayton Foundation and members of a special committee overseeing the fund Monday announced the distributions, that took place last week.

The Tragedy Fund was established just hours after the mass shooting on Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019 outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District. It included a total of 5,061 individual charitable gifts. As of November 13, 2019, committee members say, the fund totaled $3,822,463.01.

Thousands fill Fifth St. in the quater-mile stretch of business and entertainment venues of the Oregon District for a vigil honoring the victims of the August mass shooting.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

A 24-year-old man accused of helping the Dayton mass shooter has pleaded guilty to illegally possessing firearms and lying on a federal firearms form.

Ethan Kollie from Kettering appeared Wednesday in Dayton Federal court.

As part of his guilty plea Kollie acknowledged lying on a United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Form 4473 when purchasing a micro Draco pistol. He denied using illegal drugs when authorities say Kollie used marijuana and psychedelic mushrooms, an admission that would have prevented the sale from going through.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, joined by County Auditor Karl Keith, State Senator Peggy Lehner, and representatives from the advocacy group Ohioans for Gun Safety.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Several state and local elected officials Friday launched a new yard-sign campaign advocating for stronger Ohio gun laws.

Joining Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at a press conference in Dayton’s Oregon District were Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith, State Sen. Peggy Lehner and representatives from the advocacy group Ohioans for Gun Safety.

Whaley announced the “Do Something” campaign outside the Trolley Stop tavern on Fifth St.

Jeff Pedro of Sim-Trainer.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Roughly two weeks after Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled the language of his gun control legislation, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up their rhetoric. DeWine’s bill differs from the 17-point plan he released in the aftermath of the deadly Aug. 4 mass shooting in the Oregon District, and that’s sparking some advocates to recalibrate their opinions. 

The group that’s collecting petition signatures to ask voters if the state should require universal background checks on gun sales says it plans to move full steam ahead. And the effort is getting a boost from the leader of Dayton where a mass shooting in August left 10 dead, including the gunman.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley
WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

Gov. Mike DeWine plans to reveal on Monday the official bill language on expanded background checks and red-flag gun confiscation, two major issues that have been at the center of heated debate in the aftermath of the Dayton mass shooting. 

Thousands fill Fifth St. in the quater-mile stretch of business and entertainment venues of the Oregon District for a vigil honoring the victims of the August mass shooting.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Students at the University of Dayton plan to rally Friday, Oct. 4 in favor of gun reform. Organizers say they coordinated the campus protest to mark the two-month anniversary of Dayton’s deadly August mass shooting that killed nine people and injured another three dozen others.

Student organizer Cierra Stewart says she wants lawmakers to strengthen background checks and tighten firearm-sales regulations.

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