WYSO

Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Tornado damage in Celina
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Cleanup continues again today after Monday’s massive tornado outbreak across Indiana and Ohio. The storms killed at least one person and injured dozens more across the Miami Valley. Gov. Mike DeWine has declared a state of emergency for three counties: Montgomery, Greene and Mercer.

Celina, in Mercer County, was particularly hard hit. Jakob Wenning lives there. He says he saw the roof of his apartment lift during the tornado.

Fire Chief Jeffrey Payne reports there were no fatalities, four minor injuries resulting from a collapse, three minor injurites resulting from flying debris and four illnesses related to Monday's tornadoes.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton officials say results are expected soon from Ohio Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality tests in the wake of Monday's tornadoes.

A boil advisory remains in effect for many parts of Montgomery County until further notice.

At a press conference Tuesday, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says residents in affected areas can pick up free bottled water, ice and other assistance from multiple locations in the city. 

Police officers in riot gear stand on Third Street as a small Indiana Klan group rallied in Courthouse Square Saturday.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A rally by an Indiana Ku Klux Klan group in Dayton’s Courthouse Square resulted in no major problems or violence Saturday. The event drew hundreds of police officers from across the Miami Valley and the state of Ohio, and crowds of counterdemonstrators, who flooded downtown Dayton to protest the KKK.

The protestors vastly outnumbered the nine Klan members who had traveled more than 100 miles from Indiana to rally inside a fenced-off plaza in Dayton’s Courthouse Square.

Dayton City Commissioner Darryl Fairchild joins protestors on Main Street.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Note: this is a developing story. Please check back to this page for updates.

Saturday, 3:30pm: Members of the so-called Honorable Sacred Knights of Indiana have vacated Courthouse Square. Protestors are dispersing from both Main and Third Streets. 

Ahead of Saturday’s rally by an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group, Dayton officials are urging downtown residents, business owners and transit riders to prepare for disruptions.

Beginning Thursday, a number of streets near Courthouse Square will close to traffic, including Ludlow between Second and Fourth Streets. The intersection of Main and Third will also shut down.

1920 Dayton Triangles, Photo created: December 31, 1919
Public Domain

Dayton has called off plans for a National Football League field at Triangle Park after non-invasive ground penetrating radar tests showed the presence of possible Native American ancestral artifacts and remains at the site.

Testing began last week, after advocates alerted the city to the presence of sacred remains at the park, which was slated for donation of a new, professional-quality turf field from the NFL in celebration of the league’s centennial season.

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Yellow Springs will soon have a new village manager. The Village Council has appointed former Yellow Springs resident and Antioch College alum Josue Salmeron to replace Patti Bates, who has occupied the village manager’s office for almost five years and plans to retire at the end of June.

WYSO spoke with Bates, who says she’ll take with her many fond memories of her time spent working in Yellow Springs government.

Below is an interview with Bates, edited for length and clarity:

Dayton Community Police Relations organizers hosted Tuesday's meeting with police commanders.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton police and community officials are urging anyone planning to counterprotest this month’s rally by an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group to take safety precautions.

More than three dozen residents met Tuesday night at the westside Boys and Girls Club of Dayton to hear about the city’s preparations and share their concerns about the upcoming so-called Honorable Sacred Knights’ rally.

Police Chief Richard Biehl told participants the department has, “done their homework and checked with other cities,” as they map out security plans for the May 25 Courthouse Square event.

Courthouse Square Downtown Dayton Partnership
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

The city of Dayton has reached an agreement with an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan-affiliated group set to rally in Courthouse Square later this month.

The deal settles a lawsuit the city brought against the Honorable Sacred Knights over the rally and lays out the rules for the white supremacist group’s gathering.

The terms of the consent decree filed in Montgomery County civil court stipulate that Honorable Sacred Knights members will be permitted to wear masks to the rally.

1920 Dayton Triangles, Photo created: December 31, 1919
Public Domain

Dayton has hired a national consulting firm that city officials say specializes in cultural and historic preservation to conduct testing at the site of a proposed National Football League-funded field.

The recently announced NFL project at Triangle Park has been on hold for more than a week after some Native American groups warned the park is home to Native burial remains. 

The National Football League announced it would sponsor construction of a new professional-quality turf football field at Triangle Park as part of the league’s centennial season.

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