WYSO

Jason Reynolds

Community Voices Producer
Advocates for Basic Legal Equality attorney Ellis Jacobs Ellis Jacobs testifying about the Dayton Daily News sale at the commission meeting.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The Federal Communications Commission has granted the Dayton Daily News’ owner more time to find a new buyer. The extension could keep the newspaper operating seven days per week.

The future of the paper has been in question since last year when a private equity firm bought Cox Media Group’s Ohio newspaper, radio and TV stations.

Soon after the Cox Media Group purchase, Apollo Global Management said it would cut publication of the Dayton Daily News to three days per week.

The announcement sparked an immediate outcry from many Daytonians.

Matt Tepper, president of the Old North Dayton Neighborhood Association, says more than 500 homes were destroyed or severely damaged by the tornado.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Seven months since the Memorial Day tornadoes left a path of devastation across the Miami Valley, some residents in Old North Dayton are struggling to return to normal and many homes that suffered damage in the storm remain covered with tarps or sit in disrepair.

After the Memorial Day tornado outbreak, many Old North Dayton residents donated to their neighborhood association instead of giving to regional or national groups such as the Red Cross or the Dayton Foundation.

Roughly 200 people rallied in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump in Dayton Tuesday.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Roughly 200 people rallied in front of Republican Congressman Mike Turner’s office Tuesday in downtown Dayton in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump.

A coalition of Dayton anti-Trump groups organized the protest to coincide with similar so-called “Nobody Is Above the Law” rallies held in cities across the United States ahead of Wednesday’s expected House vote on impeachment.

Here’s what some protesters at the gathering had to say.

The William Preston Mayfield Photo Exhibit is on display at the Dayton Art Institute now and runs until January 5, 2020.
Dayton Art Institute. On loan from Cristina and Ren Egbert

William Preston Mayfield led a fantastic life.

He learned to take photos when he was nine, talked the Dayton Daily News into a job at twelve, and, by his early teens, became the first person to take a photograph from an airplane.

Mayfield became famous while the Dayton Art Institute was being built, so it only makes sense that a collection of his work would be on display for DAI’s Centennial.

Katherine Ryckman Siegwarth, the photography curator at DAI, says it took some time for Mayfield to gain the Wright Brothers’ trust.

Grocery Lane was the place for healthy, affordable food in Old North Dayton before the tornado. Six months after the storm, it remains boarded up.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The Old North Dayton Neighborhood Association is organizing a new effort to transport residents to nearby grocery stores after a tornado ripped apart the area's only full-service grocery. The neighborhood was among the hardest-hit in the Miami Valley Memorial Day tornado outbreak.

Stacy Meyers works at Evans Bakery in Old North Dayton. The mother of five also lives in the neighborhood and says she’s been spending $50 to $100 more on food for her family each week since the tornado destroyed the Grocery Lane store.

A regularly scheduled Oakwood meeting drew a crowd eager to hear the city respond to allegations of biased policing.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Oakwood city officials are promising to review police policies and continue a program in anti-bias training for officers.

At an Oakwood City Council meeting Monday night, officials addressed a report released this fall by the nonprofit Legal Aid firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, or ABLE, which found one-third of all Oakwood traffic tickets written in 2016 went to black drivers in a city with a black population of less than 1 percent.

Oakwood officials dispute the report’s methodology and say its data isn’t comprehensive or conclusive.

The entrance to Orange Frazer Press is hard to miss, even though it's tucked in an alley. Wilmington now has beautiful, building-sized murals all over town, but Orange Frazer's mural was one of the first.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

In the age of Amazon, e-books, and on-demand publishing, small presses have had to make big changes to stay afloat, and Orange Frazer Press in Wilmington has become one of Ohio’s most versatile small publishers. Community Voices Producer Jason Reynolds stopped by their offices to learn how this little press that could continues to thrive after 30 years.

GM Executive Gerald Johnson announcing a new $175 million Duramax parts plant in Brookville, Ohio. The plant is expected to be operational by the end of 2020 and create 100 new union jobs in Brookville.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A new Duramax factory is coming to Brookville. The DMAX plant is part of General Motors’ stated plan to invest in $700 million in Ohio.

DMAX is a joint venture, with 60 percent owned by GM and 40 percent owned by Isuzu Diesel Services of America, Inc.

Representatives from GM and Isuzu say the new $175 million diesel engine components plant will create 100 new union jobs and should be fully operational by the end of 2020. 

Dozens of DPS students and parents from across the  district attended the town hall, where students posed questions about issues including school violence, lack of parental involvement and after-school activities to district and city officials.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

At a student-organized “Youth Town Hall” Thursday night, Dayton Public Schools students voiced their concerns about the district.

The event at Thurgood Marshall High School gave students a chance to question a panel of school administrators and elected officials that included Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley.

Students, parents, and community members filled an assembly hall but only students were allowed to address the panel.

Jeff Pedro of Sim-Trainer.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Roughly two weeks after Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled the language of his gun control legislation, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up their rhetoric. DeWine’s bill differs from the 17-point plan he released in the aftermath of the deadly Aug. 4 mass shooting in the Oregon District, and that’s sparking some advocates to recalibrate their opinions. 

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