© 2023 WYSO
Our Community. Our Nation. Our World.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

A county judge halts demolition of Troy building

According to historic records, in 1841 a portion of the building was a county courthouse.
Kathryn Mobley
/
WYSO
According to historic records, in 1841 a portion of the building was a county courthouse.

A Miami County judge's ruling has saved a historic building in Troy from becoming rubble—at least for now.

The Tavern Building on West Main Street in the city of Troy survived the Civil War, the 2019 Tornadoes and now a demolition order. Earlier this month, Miami County Common Pleas Court Judge Stacy Wall overturned this order originally approved by Troy's Planning Commission.

She ruled the board did not correctly follow provisions of Troy's Zoning Code to demolish buildings in the Historic Landmark Overlay District. Wall also ruled the property owner did not submit a plan for reusing the site after demolition — a requirement of the city's zoning code.

116 W. Main St., Troy and Randy Kimmel of Covington own the building.

Meanwhile, the Troy Historic Preservation Alliance wants Troy city leaders to enforce city codes on Kimmel. Chris Manning is Vice President. She suggests the city repair the building's parapet on the roof.

“They [the city] could actually fix that and send the bill to the owner,” said Manning. “Open up the sidewalk, make the building more attractive to buyers and it would help make our downtown more appealing to visitors.”

However, City Councilman Bobby Phillips said the city can't make repairs on private property.

“We would not use tax payer money to repair someone else's property unless we had a court order directing us or saying that was okay to do.” he said.

Philips also said until the owner decides his next move, the city has fenced off the side walk in front of the building for pedestrian safety.

According to historic records, in 1841 a portion of the building was a county courthouse. During this time, this is also where African Americans — both freeborn and formerly enslaved — registered their intent to live and work in Miami county.

Kathryn Mobley is an award-winning broadcast journalist, crafting stories for more than 30 years. She’s reported and produced for TV, NPR affiliate and for the web. Mobley also contributes to several area community groups. She sings tenor with World House Choir (Yellow Springs), she’s a board member of the Beavercreek Community Theatre and volunteers with two community television operations, DATV (Dayton) and MVCC (Centerville).