WYSO

Budget Cuts

a-10 military fighter plane jet airplane
Omono / Flickr

 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has announced some details about the proposed military budget to be released by President Obama next week, and the Air Force—including Wright-Patterson Air Force Base—could see some major changes in the coming years.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is holding meetings all day Thursday to talk about cost-cutting measures. In January, base officials announced they want to attract partnerships with area businesses and governments as a way to save money.

Wright-Patt Seeks Cost Savings Through Partnerships

Jan 15, 2014
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is seeking out new community partnerships in 2014 in order to cut costs in response to ongoing budget troubles. With the wind-down of two wars and a trend towards trimming in Washington, Wright-Patt is looking for ways to control basic forms of spending on the base.

“As budgets continue to decrease,” said Colonel Cassie Barlow, head of the 88th Air Base Wing, “the Air Force looking for alternative ways to support its mission and to really maintain the quality of life that we’re used to, for our airmen and for their family members.”

The Clark County agency that helps disabled people find work and live independently is facing $4 million in budget cuts after two consecutive levy defeats. The Clark County Board of Developmental Disabilities has come up with a three-year strategic plan in order to maintain services to the disabled in the area.

The Developmental Disabilities Board previously had passed every levy request it had placed on the ballot since 1967. But voters in 2012 and 2013 rejected the request and now the organization is facing steep cuts.  

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton-area leaders are breathing sighs of relief as the proposed budget deal in Congress appears to be ending the across-the-board cuts known as sequestration.

“This deal would prevent the sequester for a 2-year period, and it also would give certainty to the Department of Defense,” said Rep. Mike Turner of Ohio’s 10th district. He’s relieved by the outcome after a year of belt-tightening for lots of government bodies, including the Pentagon. With the proposed deal the Pentagon avoids $20 billion in would-be sequestration cuts.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Last month WYSO reported that an Illinois-based hedge fund had purchased about one in eleven homes in the town of Huber Heights. The company made national news by asking Montgomery County to reduce its property taxes by over a million dollars. Now the results are in—and they weren’t as hard on the local budget as expected.

Got Debt? Ohio College Students Are Banking On It

Dec 2, 2013
SalFalko / Flickr Creative Commons

College applications deadlines are approaching, and Ohio students are facing the daunting question of how to fund their education. Financial aid is down in the state, and student debt is up.

The total budget for need-based aid in the state of Ohio peaked in 2008 at $183 million, while the 2013 budget is just $86 million. Budget cuts in 2009 are responsible for a lot of that change, and while federal Pell Grant funding has increased dramatically, that growth has been outpaced by increases in tuition and living costs.

Local Officials Sound A New Sequestration Alarm

Nov 13, 2013
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton-area officials held a public meeting Tuesday about the effects of sequestration, or automatic federal spending cuts, on the local economy. They say the outlook is gloomy if sequestration continues into 2014.

“Survival mode” and “devastation” were just a couple of the phrases tossed out at the event.

“As this goes downhill, the next thing’s gonna go downhill, and we’re gonna be in a world of hurt,” said Greene County Commission Tom Koogler.


Cedarville University has hired a new president and reorganized its finances. The university has laid off 29 non-teaching employees to help deal with a $4 million budget reallocation and selected a replacement for Bill Brown, who retired after 1o years leading the school.

The university's board of trustees issued a mandate stating that $4 million of the school's $110 million operating budget needed to be reallocated in order to keep operations sustainable.

Recently, Wittenberg University's Board of Trustees announced a plan to cut almost $5 million from the budget over the next four years.  The university's president, Dr. Laurie Joyner believes that the school is on the right track to overcoming a $7 million budget deficit and developing a plan to make the school stronger in the future.

Joyner says that Wittenberg is facing the same type of fiscal problems that most institutions of higher learning are dealing with. And the same types of significant challenges.

Pages