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"No Campaigning Beyond This Point," a sign from the 2008 election in Ohio. On Tuesday, November 4th, Ohio voters will elect a slew of statewide offices and decide on many local issues. The state offices up for grabs include governor, attorney general, secretary of state and seats on the state school board and the state Supreme Court.In the Miami Valley, three Republican U.S. Congressmen are facing challenges: John Boehner in the 8th, Mike Turner in the 10th and Steve Chabot in the 1st U.S. district.One state senate election is contested in the area—Republican Bill Beagle, of the 5th district, is defending his seat against Democratic Tipp City councilwoman Dee Gillis.Finally, there are nearly a dozen Ohio house races in the area (see the district map here and the list of candidates here) and we’re following the races for Montgomery County Commission and county auditor.The long list of local issues on Miami Valley ballots include a new tax levy for the Greene County Public Library, a Montgomery County human services levy, an income tax levy for Huber Heights, a parks levy in Beavercreek and an income tax increase in Piqua. Many school districts have levy renewals and a few are asking for increased funds.WYSO’s election night coverage will be a stream from NPR News from 8 p.m. to midnight, which is expected to focus on the U.S. Senate races. Our local and state coverage will include an interruption at 10 p.m. to check in with the Ohio Statehouse News Bureau’s hour of results and analysis in the statewide races, including Governor John Kasich’s incumbency.We’ll be updating results online Nov. 4 and 5, but most county, school district and local town or village issues will not be posted individually. Look for local results in your county on these websites:Butler County: http://results.butlercountyelections.org/Champaign County http://www.electionsonthe.net/oh/champaign/elecres.htmClark County http://www.electionsonthe.net/oh/clark/elecres.htmClinton County: http://www.electionsonthe.net/oh/clinton/ (click “Election Results” on left)Greene County: http://www.co.greene.oh.us/Archive.aspx?AMID=52Miami County: http://www.electionsonthe.net/oh/miami/elecres.htmMontgomery County: http://www.mcohio.org/boe/election_results.htmlPreble County: http://www.electionsonthe.net/oh/preble/elecres.htmWarren County: http://www.warrencountyboe.us/election_reports/search/votingresults/voting_results_publish.asp The Ohio Secretary of State’s office posts statewide unofficial election results as they become available here: https://vote.ohio.gov/Home.aspx

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley Focuses On Education In First State Of The City

The mayor says the city's education initiative is showing signs of early success in helping to prepare young people for higher education and entering the workforce.
Lewis Wallace
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WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley kept her focus on jobs and education at her first State of the City speech Tuesday.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles coming to the U.S., Mayor Whaley started by channeling the Fab Four to sum up the state of the city.

“I could try to convince you that everything in Dayton is 'ob-la-di, ob-la-da' if we could just ‘let it be,’” she said. “But my commission colleagues would probably tell me—you can’t do that.”

But Whaley quickly got serious, talking job growth and partnerships with local CEOs and committing to continue to work with the city’s largest employers to retain jobs. Echoing her inaugural speech, she called out education as the “one overriding issue that impacts all our economic development strategies.”

The last report card from the state gave Dayton Public Schools dismal ratings on test scores, graduation rates, and year-over-year improvements.

“The kids who attend low-performing schools are being cheated. Cheated out of their futures,” Whaley said.

The mayor has formed a committee of 50 educators and leaders to hold public meetings on education and advise the city commission, a move she hopes will help unite Dayton-area leaders to improve the schools from all angles, including charter and private schooling.

Whaley also discussed the city's income tax renewal coming up on the May 6 primary ballot. The 1/2 percent income tax goes to support infrastructure and operating costs for the city.