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What's It Like To Be Tested For COVID-19? One Woman's Experience

Teacher Elaine Zamonski sought coronavirus testing when her respiratory symptoms showed no improvement after a round of antibiotics. The test site was organized and efficient, she told WYSO.
WYSO
Teacher Elaine Zamonski sought coronavirus testing when her respiratory symptoms showed no improvement after a round of antibiotics. The test site was organized and efficient, she told WYSO.

Drive-through testing for the COVID-19 coronavirus disease has been underway for more than a week in Dayton. Doctors at the University of Dayton site have so far completed around 1,400 tests as the number of confirmed cases rises across the state.

Elaine Zamonski’s doctor sent her to the testing site when her cough, sore throat and respiratory symptoms failed to improve after a round of antibiotics.

After a few days of anxious waiting, the Kettering Fairmont High School Latin teacher’s results came back: negative for COVID-19. Now, Zamonski’s resting in self-quarantine at home with her husband and children.

She described her experience with the coronavirus test to WYSOs Jess Mador.

What follows is a transcript of their conversation, edited for length and clarity.

Read more about the coronavirus in Ohio and the state's response.

ELAINE: So, the first thing they did was, they did a little intake with the insurance processing. And then they sent you to the first tent and in the first tent they took a swab to test for Influenza A. And then if that came back negative, you'd get a text alert and it would say your test was negative, proceed to tent B an then in tent B, they did the coronavirus swab.

ELAINE: The nurse who did the swab said that the test takes four to seven days, not that it makes a difference because we're all quarantined anyway. It's no different than it would be if I hadn't gotten the test. It's just when you have a certain set of symptoms, they say you have to watch them and make sure that you are not having trouble breathing. And then when you do, you're supposed to go to the ER.

The family was making the best of the statewide Stay at Home coronavirus order by doing a lot of baking. Here, a homemade pizza from scratch Zamonski made with her daughter.
Credit WYSO
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WYSO
The family was making the best of the statewide Stay at Home coronavirus order by doing a lot of baking. Here, a homemade pizza from scratch Zamonski made with her daughter.

ELAINE: I don't know how I [might have come] in contact with coronavirus, but I'm around a lot of kids because Fairmount has around 2,500 students. So, it sort of hit home how important it was that the schools are closed because I'm just one person and I don't know that anybody else there has been tested, but if I tested positive, that would be just in and of itself a good reason for the school to be shut, I guess.

ELAINE: But now we're just following along with what other parents, at least my teacher and parent friends and the community are doing, which is keeping our kids apart to slow the spread. So, I mean, I'm going to keep doing that until I understand what the best thing is we should do next. 

Elaine Zamonski and her daughter are doing a lot of baking to pass the time during the statewide coronavirus Stay at Home order.
Credit WYSO
/
WYSO
Elaine Zamonski and her daughter are doing a lot of baking to pass the time during the statewide coronavirus Stay at Home order.

ELAINE: And today, I am taking it easy at home with my three kids. I just finished making a pizza from scratch with my 10 year old and I'm just trying to feel better.

[She takes a bite of pizza]

ELAINE: Oh, that's so good. Oh, God. I think we're going to do a lot of baking during our quarantine.