WYSO

Art

Barn artist Scott Hagan works on a barn at the Allen County Farm Park in Allen County, outside Lima.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In the late eighteen hundreds a group of six men were hired by Wheeling, West Virginia brothers Aaron and Samuel Bloch to advertise their tobacco product. Those men, who called themselves barn massagers, wall dogs and barn lizards, painted tobacco signs on barns located along busy roads in rural Ohio and West Virginia, which started a Nationwide trend for barn advertising.

The Apollo XI Crew photographed by Yousuf Karsh.
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Estrellita Karsh in memory of Yousuf Karsh / ©Estate of Yousuf Karsh

The first image that comes to mind when people think of Winston Churchill is of the leader scowling, his hand on his hip. It was taken by photographer Yousuf Karsh. Some of the greatest photographs of our time were taken by the Armenian refugee who fled to North America and rose to international fame. 

"[The Churchill portrait] was the international breakthrough of his career," says Karsh's 88-year-old widow and Antioch College alumna, Estrellita Karsh, on the phone from Boston.

Michael Hambouz on Vimeo

The Herndon Gallery at Antioch College is staging a new exhibition featuring the work of New York City-based artist (and Antioch alumnus) Michael Hambouz. The exhibit features 2D and 3D pieces from Hambouz spanning multiple mediums and over two decades of work. He spoke with WYSO's Niki Dakota on Excursions about his work and his inspirations and influences during his time at Antioch.

DCDC dancers perform in the heart of downtown Dayton.
courtesy of the Downtown Dayton Partnership

Art in the City combines visual and performing arts, which will be highlighted throughout the downtown Dayton as a culmination of the DP&L Summer in the City series. The Downtown Dayton Partnership's Val Beerbower visited the WYSO studios to preview the event live on Excursions with Niki Dakota, who will emcee the Community Stage. 

Art in the City is Friday, August 3, 5-10p.m. throughout downtow Dayton. Learn more at: http://www.downtowndayton.org/things-to-do/summer-in-the-city/art-in-the-city/

Artist Jes McMillan founded the nonprofit Mosaic Institute of Greater Dayton.
Mosaic Institute of Greater Dayton

A Dayton artist is working on a new way to memorialize victims of the nation’s devastating opioid epidemic.

The project would create a memorial wall made of hand-cut mosaic tiles, called the  “Wall of Perseverance.”

The memorial is the brainchild of mosaic artist Jes McMillan, founder of the Mosaic Institute of Greater Dayton

Nigerian-based artist Ben Ibebe returned to the WYSO studios to talk about a new series focused on jazz that will be featured at the Front Street studios.  Ibebe and Niki Dakota were joined in studio by the Collaboratory's Peter Benkendorf to talk about art, music and more.

Ben Ibebe's Jazz series is on display at Front Street studios beginning on Friday, July 7.  There will be an artist reception on Thursday, July 13, 5-8pm.

Chad Wells made his start in the Dayton tattoo community downtown and now things are coming full circle as Wells & Co. Custom Tattoo prepares for the grand opening of its downtown Dayton shop on Third Street, which will also feature a monthly rotating art gallery.  Chad and Michelle Wells visited the WYSO studios to talk about the opening along with Jennifer Taylor, who curated the first art exhibition, and Gary Mitchell and Chris Corn, two of the artists.

Yarn spun and died by Laura Krugh
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In the 16th century, if a person said you were woolgathering, it meant you were daydreaming. This came from the act of peasants ambling along sheep paths and gathering up the tufts of wool where it had snagged on fences and thorny bushes. This weekend woolgathering is being proudly used to describe one of the largest gatherings of fiber artists with over 100 vendors from across the country. They’ll converge on Young’s Jersey Dairy in Yellow Springs, Ohio for the 21st Annual Woolgathering.

There are estimates that say one out of 3 adjunct teachers across the country are living in poverty, and the summer months, when most students are on break, are especially tough.

To counter that seasonal economic downturn, 14 Dayton artists are hosting a one-night-only, pop-up art event called Feed the Adjuncts. 

In the following interview from WYSO Weekend, artist and adjunct teacher, Colleen Kelsey, paints a picture of the local landscape for part-time teachers which includes a look at some of the financial challenges adjuncts face. 

On May 13th and 14th, the Dayton Circus Creative Collective will celebrate Side Show 11, a music and art festival at the Yellow Cab Building.  Over 40 musicians will perform on three stages and the Yellow Cab's galleries will feature works from over 50 artists in a variety of media.

Several artists, musicians and organizers visited the WYSO studios for a week of previews on Excursions:

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