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Miami Valley Astronomical Society: Enjoy it. Experience it!

By Jon Sullivan - http://www.public-domain-image.com/public-domain-images-pictures-free-stock-photos/miscellaneous-public-domain-images-pictures/sun-public-domain-images-pictures/eclipses-sun.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?c
Wikimedia Commons: Jon Sullivan
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Skywatchers in North America are gearing up for today’s once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse. For the first time in nearly 100 years, the moon will pass directly between the sun and the earth. People in the Dayton area will be able to see it between around 1:30 and 4pm this afternoon.  

The eclipse promises to be especially awe-inspiring for anyone located under the so-called path of totality. That’s the moon’s shadow as it tracks across the earth from northern Oregon - heading southeast across the U.S. to South Carolina.  
 
The Miami Valley is located about five hours north of the “path of totality.” But Kevin Busarow, from high performance optics company Oberwerk says people will still be able to see the moon cover about 80 percent of the sun. 
 
 
Busarow says it’s important for eclipse-watchers to practice safety precautions and protect their eyes.

“Well if you’re not in the path of totality, there will be no point where it will be safe to look at the sun without the eclipse glasses or special filters on your telescope,” he says.
 
Oberwerk is in Dayton. It’s also home base for Linda Weiss - president of the Miami Valley Astronomical Society. Together the groups have given out about a thousand eclipse-viewing glasses, Weiss says.

Weiss also urges people to use eclipse glasses in viewing the astronomical event. But she says it shouldn’t be missed.

“Don’t worry about photographing it," she says, "because there again unless you have filters for your cameras you can’t really do it safely, but get your safety glasses, make your paper pin-hole boxes but get out and enjoy it. Experience it!”

Viewing glasses are already in short supply. Last week Amazon recalled thousands of glasses the online retailer says it couldn’t verify were safe for viewing.

You can find safe ways to view the eclipse without the proper glasses on our website. WYSO-dot-org. And if you miss the eclipse this time, you’ll only need to wait another seven years (April 2024) before the next total solar eclipse. And next time, the astronomical society’s Weiss says - it will take place right over Dayton. is in Dayton. It’s also home base for Linda Weiss - president of the Miami Valley Astronomical Society. Together the groups have given out about a thousand eclipse-viewing glasses, Weiss says.

Weiss also urges people to use eclipse glasses in viewing the astronomical event. But she says it shouldn’t be missed.

“Don’t worry about photographing it," she says, "because there again unless you have filters for your cameras you can’t really do it safely, but get your safety glasses, make your paper pin-hole boxes but get out and enjoy it. Experience it!”

Viewing glasses are already in short supply. Last week Amazon recalled thousands of glasses the online retailer says it couldn’t verify were safe for viewing.

You can find safe ways to view the eclipse without the proper glasses on our website. WYSO-dot-org. And if you miss the eclipse this time, you’ll only need to wait another seven years (April 2024) before the next total solar eclipse. And next time, the astronomical society’s Weiss says - it will take place right over Dayton.