WYSO

Cincinnati

Ann Thompson / WVXU

About two dozen homeless people have obeyed a court order and cleared out of their camp on Third Street in Cincinnati. 

Many of them have taken their tents and set them up just outside the area of downtown covered by the temporary restraining order signed Monday by Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Robert Ruehlman and set up on Central Parkway/Reading Road, just across from the Jack casino. 

A pallet of Pampers at the Dayton Mixing Center.
Marci Rhodes / Procter & Gamble

Ohio is located within one day’s drive of more than half the country’s population. This fact is often touted by development officials looking to boost the state’s economic profile.

It’s also a favorite talking point among many Miami Valley business leaders, who say the proximity to interstate highways gives Dayton an edge in attracting new investment.

World Police Vehicles / Flickr Creative Commons

Cincinnati officials plan to make changes to improve operations at the city's emergency call center, which is under scrutiny after the failed response to a teen who was trapped in a vehicle and died after twice calling 911.

Mayor John Cranley, council members and other city officials were touring the center Monday. They say they plan to increase staffing and improve technology and working conditions there.

Cincinnati's 911 system has been plagued with problems and is facing renewed questions following the death of 16-year-old Kyle Plush.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Cincinnati's city government is in turmoil after the mayor reportedly sought the city manager's resignation.

Officials were returning Monday to City Hall after news reports Friday that Mayor John Cranley met with City Manager Harry Black and asked him to resign. Black declined to comment during a public event Saturday.

Tyra Patterson explores her new neighborhood in downtown Cincinnati, weeks after her release from a Cleveland detention facility.
Jess Mador / WYSO

On Christmas morning Tyra Patterson left a Cleveland prison after serving 23 years of a life sentence. She was a teenager in 1994 when she was convicted in connection with the robbery and murder of Dayton 15-year-old Michelle Lai.

Patterson always said her confession to robbery was coerced. Over the years her innocence claims garnered support, including from the murder-victim’s sister, Holly Lai Holbrook.

Last fall, a state board granted parole.

Adam Hill

Cincinnati police say data from high-tech devices installed to track the sound of gunfire in the city show that people call 911 in only about one out of every six of those incidents.

The city began using a ShotSpotter system in August that covers the Avondale neighborhood and parts of others.

Flickr Creative Commons User Reneek_

The Cincinnati City Council has approved funding in the city's 2018 budget for a needle exchange program aimed at stopping the spread of HIV and hepatitis C by intravenous drug users. 

  The council voted last week to provide $150,000 to the program based at the University of Cincinnati. City money will pay for at least four mobile sites served by a van.

The program had been funded by a 20-county nonprofit health agency called Interact for Health. A Cincinnati councilman began pushing for city funding of the needle exchange program after grant money dried up.

Donald Trump
Michael Vadon / Flickr/Creative Commons

President Donald Trump will discuss his plans for a $1 trillion overhaul of the nation's crumbling roads, bridges and waterways during a speech in Ohio Wednesday.

 The president will deliver remarks at the Rivertowne Marina in Cincinnati. He's expected to press efforts to repair the nation's aging levees, dams, locks and ports, as well as his larger infrastructure aims.

The speech comes as the White House tries to push past a series of distractions and focus on Trump's legislative agenda.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Tom Kavana/Flickr Creative Commons

The head of a Cincinnati-area drug task force is calling on the state to declare a public health emergency to free up more resources for fighting heroin.

After a recent spike of overdoses, Newtown Police Chief Tom Synan, who heads the task force, is calling the situation a public health crisis. 

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