WYSO

red light cameras

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

A judge has granted the city of Dayton’s request for an injunction, putting on hold some provisions in the recently passed state transportation budget. City officials had sued the state over the provisions reducing local state government funding by every dollar generated by red light camera ticketing programs.

Dayton argued the provisions violate the city’s established right to home rule.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton officials say the city’s red light camera program will continue after a Lucas County judge blocked new state restrictions from taking effect. Under a provision in the Ohio transportation budget Gov. Mike DeWine signed into law back in April, the restrictions were set to begin Wednesday.

I-75 north of Cincinnati. Many in the Dayton area are living further from jobs than they did in the year 2000.   highway
Travis Estell / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is vowing to fight a provision in the new two-year state transportation budget that would penalize cities for the use of red-light traffic cameras. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine Wednesday signed the bill, which also raises Ohio’s gas tax to fund road and bridge infrastructure repairs.

The transportation budget requires cities that operate red-light cameras to report any fines the cameras generate, and for the state to deduct that income from their state aid allocations.

The city reported roughly $1.9 million in revenue from its camera program 2018.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

Group members allege the cameras unfairly target vulnerable communities in the Miami Valley.

The organization is aiming to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition to put the issue on the November ballot.

NAACP President Derrick Foward says the cameras disproportionately affect poor residents.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is activating traffic cameras at two more sites Monday. A total of five intersections within city limits are now camera monitored.

Red-light cameras have officially been activated at the intersections of James H. McGee Blvd and Third Street and Linden Avenue and Smithville Rd. Violators will be issued warnings for the first 30 days after activation. After that, $85 citations will be issued by mail.

Speed cameras are already operating at three other city intersections:

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

An Ohio village ordered to pay back $3 million in citations stemming from automated traffic cameras is taking its case to the state Supreme Court.

 The Hamilton-Middletown Journal News reports New Miami has asked the Ohio Supreme Court to hear its appeal. Lower courts have ruled that New Miami isn't immune to legal action because it gained funds by collecting fines under a traffic camera program that was declared unconstitutional in 2014.

The village argues sovereign immunity is guaranteed to municipalities across the state and necessary for preserving "fiscal integrity."

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Traffic cameras will officially be activated in Dayton next month, according to a press release issued by the city.

Red light and speed cameras at 5 major intersections could be turned on as early as Sunday, October 1. Cameras will be located on: 

 

James H. McGee Blvd. at Third St.

N. Main St. at Siebenthaler Ave. 

N. Gettysburg Ave at Fairbanks Ave.

Linden Ave at  Smithville Rd. 

S. Keowee St. between Third St. and Fifth St.  

Red Light, Speed Cameras To Operate 24/7 in Dayton

Sep 6, 2017
traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton officials are moving forward with plans to re-install red light cameras in the city, after a recent Ohio Supreme Court decision lifted tough state restrictions.

Red light and speed cameras will soon operate at five heavily trafficked intersections in Dayton. The city’s camera program has been shuttered since 2015, when state lawmakers enacted new usage regulations.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Once again, state lawmakers are trying to green light new rules for how communities can use speed and red light cameras, especially smaller communities that get a big percentage of their revenue from tickets.

Columbus Democratic Rep. Hearcel Craig is going after communities without mayors’ courts that are running traffic camera programs. He says some violations come with fines in the hundreds to thousands of dollars which he says is “abusive and excessive."

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Officials in Dayton plan to resume using cameras to catch drivers who run red lights, two years after dropping that practice to comply with Ohio restrictions and a legal battle.

The Dayton City Commission approved the program's restart in a 5-0 vote Wednesday.

City officials say speed detectors and red-light cameras will make the city safer. Police officials have said traffic crashes increased, and the number of traffic deaths doubled after the original red light cameras were removed.

Pages