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Lauren Hodges

Lauren Hodges is an associate producer for All Things Considered. She joined the show in 2018 after seven years in the NPR newsroom as a producer and editor. She doesn't mind that you used her pens, she just likes them a certain way and asks that you put them back the way you found them, thanks. Despite years working on interviews with notable politicians, public figures, and celebrities for NPR, Hodges completely lost her cool when she heard RuPaul's voice and was told to sit quietly in a corner during the rest of the interview. She promises to do better next time.

A gay rights activist and his friend were killed Monday night in Bangladesh's capital, Dhaka, by a group of assailants reportedly armed with machetes and guns.

Their deaths are the latest in "a series of attacks on progressive voices that has deepened anxiety about growing fundamentalism in the tiny Muslim country, which borders India," NPR's Julie McCarthy tells our Newscast unit.

Xulhaz Mannan and a man said to be a close friend were slain by a half-dozen men posing as couriers when they forced their way inside Mannan's apartment, Julie reports.

National Intelligence Director James Clapper said Monday that he is looking at "several options" to make public the number of U.S. citizens caught up in online surveillance of foreign targets by the U.S. government.

The city of Cleveland agreed Monday to pay $6 million to settle a civil rights lawsuit brought by the family of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old boy who was shot and killed by a police officer on Nov. 22, 2014.

The city did not admit any wrongdoing in the killing of Tamir, who was holding an air pellet gun and walking outside a recreation center when he was shot by Officer Timothy Loehmann.

The Associated Press has filed a lawsuit against the DOJ related to a 2007 sting operation in which the FBI created a fake AP news story and an agent impersonated a journalist. The FBI was trying to apprehend a teenage suspect in several bomb threats in Washington state.

Simmons College announced it will close the campus master's degree program in business, the only one of its kind in the nation exclusively for women.

The National Portrait Gallery says it has no plans to heed calls by conservatives and anti-abortion activists to remove a bust of Margaret Sanger from an exhibit on civil rights. Sanger, who died in 1966, was an early supporter and activist for the birth control movement and the founder of Planned Parenthood.

NPR's Pam Fessler tells our Newscast unit that "the demands are part of a larger campaign against Planned Parenthood, after its employees were recorded talking about providing fetal tissue to medical researchers."

A Kentucky county clerk's office denied a marriage license for a same-sex couple on Thursday, despite a federal appeals court ruling the night before that upheld a judge's order compelling her to issue the licenses.

Citing religious objections, Kim Davis of Rowan County has refused to issue any marriage licenses since the Supreme Court's ruling June 26 that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide.

Mothers from around the country gathered in the nation's capital Saturday to protest police brutality in a march from Capitol Hill to the Justice Department.

The Facebook page for the Million Moms March on Washington event is overflowing with posts by mothers who lost their children to violent encounters with law enforcement. Joining them are grieving spouses, siblings and friends of those who died, posting photos, sharing their own experiences and voicing their support.

A U.S. district judge ruled Friday that the U.S. must release photos of American soldiers inflicting abuse on prisoners in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The ruling is a victory for The American Civil Liberties Union, which filed a lawsuit against the government in 2004, seeking the release of the photos. The ACLU claimed the pictures revealed significant human rights violations, specifically at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

Addressing a crowd at the Clinton Global Initiative University at Miami University in Coral Gables, Fla. on Saturday, former president Bill Clinton discussed the Clinton Foundation's decision to accept donations from foreign governments. The foundation's choice is questioned by critics as a possible conflict of interest, especially since some of the funds came in during Hillary Clinton's tenure as secretary of state, a post she left in 2013.

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