WYSO

Dayton Youth Radio

WYSO is committed to putting local voices on the air. We give local voices the time and space to tell their own stories, in their own words, without commercial interruptions. Our Community Voices training program for adults has been doing this since 2011. In 2014 we expanded that program to include high school students. They are the future of Dayton – and they have a lot to say.

Dayton Youth Radio project manager Basim Blunt teaches broadcasting and storytelling skills to high school students. Basim works with about 45 teenagers each year from various schools in the Miami Valley, guiding each students' story from the classroom to the WYSO airwaves.

We plan to keep diversifying the types of schools we work with. In 2016-17 we continued to serve Dayton’s urban core by working with Ponitz Career Technology Center and Stivers School for the Arts, but also worked with the suburbs (Centerville High School), a rural district (Tecumseh High School) and a private school (Miami Valley School).

Dayton Youth Radio is supported by the Virginia W. Kettering Foundation, the Vectren Foundation, and the Ohio Arts Council

The Best of Dayton Youth Radio: It's Just Family

Jan 16, 2020
Olivia Brintlinger-Conn
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Since its start, Dayton Youth Radio has featured the voices of over 200 Miami Valley teenagers from nine area high schools.  Starting this week, we’re going to share some of the Best Of Dayton Youth Radio so far, and we’ll be back with new stories in the spring.

In 2016, then-Yellow Springs High School student Olivia Brintlinger-Conn talked about family and adoption.

The Best Of Dayton Youth Radio: Luke Skywalker As A Teenager

Jan 9, 2020
In 2018, Dayton Youth Radio producer Billy Pittl talked about the fictional and real-life characters in his life.
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Since its start, Dayton Youth Radio has featured the voices of over 200 Miami Valley teenagers from nine area high schools.  Starting this week, we’re going to share some of the Best Of Dayton Youth Radio so far, and we’ll be back with new stories in the spring.

In 2018, then-Centerville High School student Billy Pittl talked about the fictional and real-life characters that can help us on our journey through life.

Malik Simmons
Basim Blunt / WYSO

My name is Malik Simmons. I am 17 years old and I go to David H. Ponitz. I have my granny's name tattooed on me, and it means a lot to me. I can take her everywhere with me. It brings me comfort. When I get sidetracked or distracted for what my goal is in life, I just look down at my arm and I know how to get back on track.

Kayla Tucker
Basim Blunt / WYSO

I'm Kayla Tucker. I'm a senior at David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center. I'm 17 years old. I'm also a first year varsity cheerleader for basketball and football. When I was 10 years old, I experienced the aftermath of a hurricane that flooded the river by our house so much that the cold water covered my feet as I stood on the sidewalk. I didn't realize how much power and strength the weather had.

I was reminded of that power once again last Memorial Day weekend when several tornadoes touched down in Dayton on May 27, 2019

Darius Coleman
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Before you spend too much time wondering what to give that teenager on your holiday shopping list, you should listen to this story by Darius "Ace" Coleman, who says his parents always brought him everything he wanted. 

My name is Darius Coleman. I'm 16, born and raised in Dayton, Ohio. I go to a school called DECA High. I play football, had a perfect season, 0 and 10. I live with my mom, Janay. I go to my dad's house every other weekend. His name is Anthony.

Dorian Mays
Basim Blunt / WYSO

I remember going to the Oregon District with my family back in February. I was with my mom and aunts because they were getting matching tattoos. I remember eating spicy and lemon pepper wings at Blind Bob's with my uncle and sister. We were getting hungry while waiting for my mom and aunts to have their tattoos finished. It was February, so it was a bit chilly, partly cloudy, but that didn't stop the smiles and laughter from the people walking around.

Jackson Sawyer
Basim Blunt / WYSO

My name is Jackson Sawyer. I'm 17, and I'm a senior at Centerville High School. Anyone who is a middle child knows that being the middle child is the worst. I'm never taken seriously when I want to be, and I never get the sympathy I want when I need it. I have five siblings, and I live with my parents.

Having five siblings is normal, but my family is even less normal than that as my three youngest siblings are all adopted.

Jalen Brown
Basim Blunt / WYSO

16 year old Jaylen Brown told our Dayton Youth Radio class at Dayton Early College Academy about some of the things he loves: his family, gangsta rap from the 90s and lots of sweets, cookies, candy bars, soda, donuts.  But then he realized that good things don't last forever. 

I used to eat candy, sweets and meat for days. My diet was terrible. I didn't listen to my mother who did try to tell me right, but she had to work so she couldn't enforce it as much. My teeth were bad back then.

Brittney Murphy
Basim Blunt / WYSO

What do Katy Perry, Denzel Washington and George Stephanopoulos have in common with Dayton Youth Radio producer Brittney Murphy? They're all PKs or preacher's kids. 17 year old Brittney shares her memories of her father.

Me being able to accept Christ as my holy savior is thanks to Reverend George Dean Murphy Junior, my pastor and my father.

Imagine instruments playing, children and adults singing, and a pastor that keeps you in the presence of the Lord.

Nina Edwards
Basim Blunt / WYSO

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we'll meet a senior from the David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center. Teenager Nina Edwards says the history lessons taught in public school doesn't reflect her culture.

Hello, my name is Nina Edwards, and I'm a Black girl in a white man's world. I attend Ponitz CTC, where the racial makeup is more than half Black kids.

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