WYSO

Dayton Youth Radio

WYSO is committed to putting local voices on the air. We give local voices the time and space to tell their own stories, in their own words, without commercial interruptions. Our Community Voices training program for adults has been doing this since 2011. In 2014 we expanded that program to include high school students. They are the future of Dayton – and they have a lot to say.

Dayton Youth Radio project manager Basim Blunt teaches broadcasting and storytelling skills to high school students. Basim works with about 45 teenagers each year from various schools in the Miami Valley, guiding each students' story from the classroom to the WYSO airwaves.

We plan to keep diversifying the types of schools we work with. In 2016-17 we continued to serve Dayton’s urban core by working with Ponitz Career Technology Center and Stivers School for the Arts, but also worked with the suburbs (Centerville High School), a rural district (Tecumseh High School) and a private school (Miami Valley School).

Dayton Youth Radio is supported by the Virginia W. Kettering Foundation, the Vectren Foundation, and the Ohio Arts Council

Fifteen: Miami Valley Teenagers Reflect On Their First Protest

Jun 5, 2020
Ja' Nya Lewis and Joe Freeman
courtesy of Ja' Nya Lewis and Joe Freeman

If you've been watching media coverage of the nationwide demonstrations against police brutality, you may have noticed a lot of young people on the frontlines. Dayton Youth Radio project manager Basim Blunt had a phone conversation with Ja' Nya Lewis and Joe Freeman, two local teenagers were protesting Dayton. 

Timmy Lien and Blake Leach
courtesy of Timmy Lien and Blake Leach

In this final installment of Dayton Youth Radio's Teens In Quarantine miniseries, Fairmont High School students Blake Leach and Timmy Lien talk about life during the coronavirus pandemic.

Timmy Lien

The work online is definitely more reasonable than in class, which I am thankful for. But when I'm done, there is not really anything else to do. I cook sometimes, I can follow recipe, but my diet hasn't really changed since the lockdown.

Isaiah Jackson and Roderic Blake
courtesy of Isaiah Jackson and Roderic Blake

This week on Dayton Youth Radio, a story about teens in quarantine from Isaiah Jackson and Roderic Blake, two juniors at Fairmont High School who are also best friends.

Isaiah Jaskon

Hi, my name is Isaiah Jackson. I'm 16, almost 17 years old, and I'll be 17 in August. I live with my dad and my sister.

I would say I'm a pretty chill person, honestly, because you can't go on being mad at everything or being annoyed. But usually I'm annoyed, I just don't show it.

Nick Kvalheim And Nichole Henderson
courtesy of Nick Kvalheim And Nichole Henderson

This week on Dayton Youth Radio, we have the fourth feature from our Teens In Quarantine series, with stories from Nick Kvalheim, a student at Oakwood High School and Nicole Henderson a student at Fairmont High School.

Nick Kvalheim

Max Gallanstein And Ethan McFarren
courtesy of Max Gallanstein And Ethan McFarren

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we continue our Teens In Quarantine series with two stories from students at Fairmont High School. First, we'll hear from Max Gallanstein, who's a big sports fan, and then we'll hear from Ethan McFarren, who produces dance music from his bedroom recording studio.

Max Gallantstein

Hello, my name is Max Gallanstein. I'm a junior at Fairmont High School. I live with my two parents, Mary and Phillip, and I have two older brothers.

Dylan Potts and Ashley Daniels are juniors at Kettering Fairmont High School.
courtesy of Dylan Potts and Ashley Daniels

This week on Dayton Youth Radio, the second feature in our Teens In Quarantine series. Dylan Potts and Ashley Daniels, two juniors from Kettering Fairmont High School talk about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting life as a teenager.

Dylan Potts

The first thing I'm going to do after this coronavirus stuff is finished with, is get my hair cut because it's already been forever since I've gotten a cut. By the time this is over, my hair is going to be crazy.

Laura Hutchens leads the Interactive Media Program at Kettering Fairmont High School.
courtesy of Laura Hutchens

Laura Hutchens leads the Interactive Media Program, part of the Career Tech Center at Fairmont High School in Kettering Ohio. Her students produce all kinds of videos for school and the community. They create radio broadcasts, graphic design projects and much more. The school even has a campus radio station WKET 98.3 FM Kettering.

Imani Reed and Molly Mitchell are juniors at Kettering Fairmont High School.
courtesy of Imani Reed and Molly Mitchell

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we have a new series from Kettering Fairmont High School. Students there were eager to talk about life under quarantine, and so their teacher, Laura Hutchens, called us up and our collaboration began

Today we'll hear from Imani Reed and Molly Mitchell, both juniors at Kettering Fairmont High School. 

Imani Reed

Mandela Brown
Basim Blunt / WYSO

We have a history of mistrust between African-Americans and our nation's police officers who have been sworn to enforce the laws in times of slavery, Jim Crow, legalized segregation, and now the war on drugs. In this last installment of The Best of Dayton Youth Radio, we have a story that first aired three years ago by a Centerville high school student named Mandela Brown.  

It was a summer night at only 9 p.m.  My three friends and I had gone to get ice cream, but Trey didn't have cash, so we went to the Wright-Patt Credit Union so he could use the ATM.

The Best of Dayton Youth Radio: A Full House

Apr 10, 2020
Daylan McKinney
Basim Blunt / WYSO

This week on the Best of Dayton Youth Radio we have a story from Daylan McKinney from Ponitz Career Technology Center in Dayton. McKinney was a senior when this story first aired two years ago. He wanted to deal with a topic that a lot of our high school kids are grappling with, the effect of divorce on a family.

I’m 17 years old and a former athlete. I used to play basketball for Ponitz, and I played from freshman to junior year. Then I stopped playing.

Pages