WYSO

WWII

Veterans' Voices: A WWII Veterans Recalls His Navy Days

Jan 15, 2020
Colleen Murphy and Richard Meyer
StoryCorps

World War II was the most widespread war in history with more than 100 million men and woman serving in military units. Navy veteran Richard Meyer of Dayton tells his stepdaughter, Colleen Murphy, some of his memories while serving at sea during World War II.

Transcript:

Colleen Murphy (CM): So, since you came into our lives when you married my mom, we've been hearing all the wonderful stories you have. It'd be nice to capture all these stories for the kids that aren't here yet.

Dayton resident Robert Kahn saw his childhood home of Mannheim, Germany invaded the Nazis during WWII.
Leo DeLuca / WYSO

In November 1938, the Nazi leadership in Germany organized a series of violent actions against Jewish citizens all across the country.  German soldiers attacked the homes, synagogues and businesses of Jews and more than 30 thousand Jewish men were taken to concentration camps. 

Those attacks are known as Kristall Nacht, the night of broken glass, referring to the shattered glass on streets and sidewalks in the aftermath. It’s often seen as the beginning of The Holocaust, the mass genocide of Jews and other minorities in Europe during World War II.

Da'Leron Daniels
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this edition of Dayton Youth Radio we'll meet Dai'laron Daniels, a junior from Thurgood Marshall STEM High School, and hear an interview he did with his grandpa Jim, an African American veteran from World War II.

My grandfather's name is Jim Guy. He's not my biological grandfather; he became my grandfather when he adopted me and my older brother Da'lin as his grandchildren. He was one of the first people to hold me at the hospital after I was born. I did this interview with my grandfather, and it was pretty amazing what he was telling me.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force near Dayton is marking the 75th anniversary of D-Day Thursday. There's a wreath-laying ceremony and flyover by two C-47s, the main transport aircraft used on D-Day.

Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher (left), Lt. Col. Edward Saylor (center) and Lt. Col. Richard Cole (right) stand at the Doolittle Raider Monument at Memorial Park in Dayton, Ohio.
Jerry Kenney

The last remaining Doolittle Raider passed away early Monday morning in San Antonio. Dayton native retired Air Force Lt. Col. Richard Cole was 103 years old.

Cole took part in a top secret mission to bomb Japan in 1941, just four months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, when 80 men took off from an aircraft carrier. They were led by Lt. James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle and soon after their mission they became known as the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.

Fred T. Korematsu Institute

In 1942 at the age of 23, an American citizen named Fred Korematsu experienced something that still reverberates in the legal world today.

The United States government arrested and jailed Korematsu after he refused to go willingly to an incarceration camp for Japanese Americans. The camps, more commonly referred to as internment camps, were established through an executive order by then-Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt, and existed from 1942 to 1945.

B-17F Memphis Belle over Europe
Dan Patterson Archival Collection

On May 17, the National Museum of the United States Air Force opens an exhibit about the Memphis Belle, a WWII B-17 Flying Fortress.  The exhibit tells the story of the Memphis Belle and her crew, one of the first American bombers to survive 25 missions, at a time when surviving 10 missions was considered lucky.  Aviation commentator Dan Patterso has a few thoughts.

The first atomic bomb was dropped on the city of Hiroshima in Japan in 1945. Shortly thereafter another bomb was detonated over the Japanese city of Nagasaki. Our war with Japan ended shortly thereafter.

Much has been written about what happened at Hiroshima. Much less has been said about Nagasaki. Susan Southard conducted extensive interviews with some residents of Nagasaki who survived that nuclear blast.

Caro Bosca: Flying And Flourishing Above The Clouds

Oct 9, 2015
Caro Bosca in 2001
Dan Patterson

Seventy years ago, Americans were celebrating the end of the Second World War and beginning the much-anticipated return to normal life, but "normal" had changed. Men who had gone to war expected to return to jobs and families, but while they were away, the homefront, as it was known, had changed. Aviation commentator Dan Patterson has a local story for us today:

 

After the Japanese launched their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor the morale of most Americans was quite low. The United States had finally been drawn into another war and in Washington, D.C. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was searching for something that could encourage Americans. FDR was looking for a way to strike back at the Japanese. James M. Scott describes the plans that were made and the astonishing result of that planning in his new work of history "Target Tokyo - Jimmy Doolittle and the Raid That Avenged Pearl Harbor."

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