WYSO

workforce development

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base’s workforce is aging, with roughly half of workers currently eligible to retire soon. Now, Ohio jobs, education and military officials are teaming up to attract more young people to jobs at Wright-Patt, the state’s largest single-site employer.

Around 5,000 new jobs are expected to be added at the base over the next seven years, many of them requiring advanced degrees, science, technology, engineering and math skills.

Sinclair Dean of Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Anthony Ponder says the federal grant will help prepare students for high paying and relatively recession-proof employment in the manufacturing sector. 
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

With help from a federal Department of Labor grant announced Wednesday, Clark State Community College, Sinclair Community College and the Dayton Region Manufacturers Association will work together to train 365 skilled workers over the next four years, and match them with Miami Valley manufacturing employers.

Wilmington resident Charles Wells lost his job at DHL when the company closed its Wilmington operation in 2009.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Online retail giant Amazon is hosting employment information sessions across the Miami Valley this week. The first was held Monday morning in Wilmington, where Amazon officials say they’re looking to hire hundreds of new workers at the company's new facility at Wilmington Air Park.

The jobs sorting packages and moving cargo are expected to start at $15 an hour -- a prospect that had attracted more than two dozen job seekers by 8 a.m. 

Gov. Mike DeWine used his first State of the State address to emphasize the importance on building towards a better future. He said Ohio can do this by investing in programs that support early childhood development, public health, and workforce development - and by raising the gas tax.

State of Manufacturing Tour held Wednesday at Staub Manufacturing in Dayton.
Jerry Kenney

U.S. Senator Rob Portman was in Dayton on Wednesday to meet with more than 20 local business leaders and state legislators about workforce development. Portman is promoting a number of measures aimed at connecting highly skilled workers with open jobs around the state.

Portman told the gathering that the workforce development gap is one of the biggest issues facing businesses across Ohio.

Nuvasive officials say the more than $45 million 180,000-square-foot, all-digital West Carrollton facility will generate at least 200 new jobs for the company, which also has operations in Fairborn.
WYSO/Jess Mador

At medical device maker NuVasive’s new West Carrollton facility, workers in safety glasses stand at rows of off-white machines that look kind of like giant baby incubators. The atmosphere is bright, airy and clean.

Montgomery County Commision President Debbie Leiberman (center) and other county and business leaders annouce $2.7 million awarded to the county for workforce development.
Jerry Kenney

Montgomery County has announced $2.7 million in new federal and state funding for workforce development.

The county’s workforce division will use two U.S. Department of Labor grants to fund job training programs in manufacturing, logistics, and transportation.

Sinclair Community College President Steve Johnson (center) welcomes democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown to the college.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown visited Sinclair Community College Tuesday to talk about shortages in skilled workers—and talk up his part in amending the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Since 1998, the WIA has funneled billions in federal dollars towards workforce training programs at the state and local levels.

Dayton-Area Unemployment Is Up From Fall 2012

Nov 26, 2013
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

    

Blame it on the government shutdown: we missed a month of job reports this fall. But during that time, frankly not much happened. Unemployment in the greater Dayton area ticked up from 7.3 percent in August to 7.5 percent in October, with the number of jobs hovering around the October total of 369,600.

This week at WYSO we’ve been talking about the future of manufacturing. A lot of area manufacturers say the business is growing, but they need better-trained young people to carry the torch. They aren’t the only employers struggling to fill job openings, despite high unemployment in the region. So why are so many young people falling through the cracks?

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