WYSO

Weather

thermometer showing high heat
Mr.TinDC / Flickr Creative Commons

An excessive heat watch has been issued for Southwest Ohio beginning Friday afternoon and ending Saturday evening.  The National Weather Service says high pressure over much of the U.S. will raise the heat index to 105 degrees or higher.

Officials with Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County say extremely high temperatures can lead to health issues, including heat stroke and heat exhaustion, especially among the elderly, infants and children, the homeless and those with chronic medical conditions.  They offered the following safety tips:

The state is giving farmers another opportunity to apply for loans as they deal with severe weather and flooding that has kept many farmers from planting their crops. 

Fire Chief Jeffrey Payne reports there were no fatalities, four minor injuries resulting from a collapse, three minor injurites resulting from flying debris and four illnesses related to Monday's tornadoes.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton officials say results are expected soon from Ohio Environmental Protection Agency drinking water quality tests in the wake of Monday's tornadoes.

A boil advisory remains in effect for many parts of Montgomery County until further notice.

At a press conference Tuesday, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says residents in affected areas can pick up free bottled water, ice and other assistance from multiple locations in the city. 

rain
Santosh Kumar / Flickr Creative Commons

It's been a wet spring here in Southwest Ohio. April showers dropped above-average rainfall amounts, and more rain is in the forecast for the rest of the week. Drive along the county roads in this region and you can see a lot of muddy fields and standing water, and so we wanted to know: if you're a farmer, are you worried about too much rain?

In Greene County, the birds are singing, the chickens are clucking, and in the distance another storm is moving in. In this part of Ohio there has been above average rainfall for the past 6 months.

winter robin
Mulletar / Flickr Creative Commons

Dayton, Brookville and some other communities have set up warming centers as a blast of cold air moves through the area over the next couple of days. According to the National Weather Service, temperatures are expected to fall below zero during the overnight hours from Tuesday through Thursday of this week:

Montgomery County will be under the Level 2: Extreme Cold Severe Weather Plan starting 4:00 p.m. on January 29, 2019 and ending at 8:00 a.m. on February 1, 2019. 

Jerry Kenney

There’s an old farming adage when it comes to corn crops: “knee-high by the Fourth of July.” The traditional saying refers to how tall a good corn crop should be by that date. But for many Miami Valley farmers this year, the corn crop passed that benchmark some time ago.  

Ty Kalaus, regional deputy director for the United States Department of Agriculture, Great Lakes Region says some of the credit goes to this spring and summer’s alternately rainy -- and then hot, dry weather. 

Renee Wilde / WYSO

The National Weather Service (NWS) has confirmed a tornado with winds reaching 90 miles per hour touched down Tuesday in eastern Beavercreek Township and western Xenia Township along Ludlow Road. Another touched down in Grove City in Franklin County. NWS officials say they will continue to survey storm damage in Clark and Greene counties over the next few days.

tornado wall cloud national weather service Photo taken near US 35 and I-75, just west of Dayton, at around 7 p.m. Wednesday
WYSO/ Jerry Kenney

Authorities say tornadoes that touched down in three southwest Ohio counties have caused damage while 15 people trapped by flooding had to be rescued from a park.

Suspected tornado damage was reported Wednesday night in Clark, Greene and Miami counties. A gas station was destroyed in Clark County and some residents of a nearby damaged apartment complex were evacuated.

No serious injuries have been reported.

NWS

Meteorologists say tens of millions of Americans from Washington to Boston and the Ohio Valley could be walloped by an end-of-the-week snowstorm.
 
Although it's still early, computer forecast models are forecasting a windy, strong storm. The big questions are where and how much.
 
National Weather Service forecaster Rich Otto said some major cities will likely see a foot or more of snow. Other meteorologists talk about 18 inches, two feet and more.
 

Corn harvest
United Soybean Board / Flickr/Creative Commons

All of this summer's rain isn't just ruining your outdoor plans—it's taking a toll on Ohio's $100 billion farming industry.

Ohio’s largest industry is taking a big hit thanks to this summer’s wet weather. Ohio Farm Bureau spokesman Joe Cornely says a lot of the state’s corn and soybean crops didn’t get planted in time, and those that did are getting drowned out.

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