WYSO

voting rights

Nearly two dozen groups and individuals are asking Ohio’s top elections official for a list of voters who could be dropped from the rolls this fall, so they can try to get them re-registered. 

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected challenges against two congressional maps in Maryland and North Carolina on Thursday, deciding that questions of partisan gerrymandering are outside the scope of courts.

Their decision likely spells the end for a similar challenge out of Ohio, whose congressional maps were ruled an "unconstitutional partisan gerrymander" by a lower court.

Sharyn Rigsbee, Franklin County Board of Elections, demonstrating voting machine for no/low sight voters.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Sharyn Rigsbee demonstrates a special voting machine at the Franklin County Board of Elections. This machine is designed for low vision or no vision voters, and Rigsbee says the technology is available at county boards of elections throughout the state.

"Think of it. You have the ability to submit and cast your own independent vote," she says.  "To know that you can do that without the assistance of a poll worker or another person, it has to be incredibly rewarding to know they can do that like any other person on Election Day."

Shaun King speaks at Antioch College's Freedom to Vote rally
Dennie Eagleson

The Freedom To Vote rally was held Sunday on the Antioch College campus in Yellow Springs. It was hosted by the College's Coretta Scott King Center and its purpose was raise awareness of the importance of voting and to provide the the opportunity to register to vote.

Civil rights activist and author Shaun King was the keynote speaker.  He told the crowd of more than 250 people that it takes more than a good idea to support a cause.

Juneteenth Celebration Focuses On Ohio Voting Rights

Jun 19, 2018
Wesley Community Center

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that Ohio can remove voters from registration rolls if they do not return a mailed form confirming their address and then do not vote for the next four years. Dayton Wesley Community Center members say voting is a big component in freedom.

Last weekend, the Wesley Center celebrated Juneteenth, a national holiday recognizing the day slavery was abolished and celebrating African American independence. According to Wesley Center Executive Director Yvette Kelly-Fields, voting rights were highlighted in the Center's celebration.

Ohio's Current Congressional District Map.  Efforts are underway to eliminate gerrymandering
Wikipedia.

Voting rights’ advocates are holding an informational workshop this weekend to update Miami Valley residents about Congressional redistricting-reform efforts. Organizers says the event is about raising awareness. A previous measure to reform Ohio’s redistricting process has stalled in Columbus.

 

WYSO

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Voting rights advocates say recently passed Ohio voting laws create new hurdles for black and Hispanic voters casting absentee and provisional ballots.

The advocates argue these laws and similar orders by the state's elections chief unconstitutionally allow votes to be thrown out for ID errors.

The advocates say the laws let absentee ballots be rejected for mistakes such as the wrong birth month even though the voter supplied the correction information when requesting the ballot.

 

Group Files Lawsuit Against Ohio Over Voting Rules

May 12, 2015
Jon Husted is Ohio's 53rd Secretary of State
www.sos.state.oh.us

In advance of the 2016 presidential race, Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted faces another lawsuit over the state's voting rules. 

The lawsuit was filed by a group called the Ohio Organizing Collaborative.

Among the provisions it challenges are rules limiting each county to one early voting location, as well as the elimination of Golden Week, when voters can register and cast ballots the same day. The suit alleges African-American, Hispanic and student voters are disproportionately affected.

vote election voters
elycefeliz / Flickr/Creative Commons

Some Democratic state lawmakers say they might vote against the proposed transportation budget because of a provision that could restrict voting rights. The plan would make it more difficult for some college students to vote in Ohio.

The organization that represents elections officials throughout Ohio has not taken a position on the federal court’s most recent ruling on changes to the state’s elections laws. Last week the court ordered the state to go back to some of the early voting options that were in place in 2010, but have since been eliminated by new laws. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted plans to appeal the ruling, but Aaron Oeckerman with the Ohio Association of Election Officials says his group didn’t ask Husted to do that.

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