WYSO

State Budget

Gov. Mike DeWine signed the state operating budget 17 days after the deadline, and 10 hours after a temporary budget expired.

Finally, Ohio has a new two-year operating budget. Gov. Mike DeWine signed it into law this morning.

Dayton Public Schools
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

Dayton Public Schools will avoid state takeover this year, under the state budget agreement sent to Governor Mike DeWine. 

The deal puts a temporary moratorium on the creation of new Academic Distress Commissions (ADC), the state-appointed groups that step in when school districts repeatedly receive failing grades.

An ADC would have stepped in at DPS this fall if its scores didn’t improve. With the approval of the state budget, the district will avoid that fate for at least for one year.

Dayton Public Schools Vice President Jocelyn Rhynard says she’s relieved.

dayton convention center
Dayton Convention & Visitors Bureau

Miami Township officials say they’re not happy with a provision in Ohio House Bill 166, the proposed operating budget for the state through 2021. 

The township is taking issue with a provision in the proposed budget that would increase taxes for all Montgomery County lodging facilities, including those in Miami Twp.

Ohio lawmakers failed to reach a state budget agreement by the midnight deadline, missing the mark for a spending deal for the new two-year cycle. Because the House and Senate couldn’t reach a compromise, both chambers passed a temporary budget extension to keep the government running. 

It’s looking like the conference committee working on a compromise state budget will go into the weekend – with the deadline to sign the budget on Sunday night. And among the differences between the House and Senate versions is an income tax cut and a small business tax break. 

The two-year state budget is headed to a conference committee Tuesday to work out significant differences between the House and Senate versions. And there isn’t much time to deal, because the budget must be signed by Sunday night.

March 15 was the deadline for Gov. Mike DeWine to release his two-year budget. He’d already unveiled several proposals, but now more is known about his priorities in his $69 billion budget, and how he says he’ll pay for them.

The state budget director was off by almost a billion dollars in its projections on tax collections for the fiscal year. But his prediction that the year that ended last week would close in the black was right.

There may have been occasional disagreements between Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich, but he’d issued more than a hundred vetoes in his seven years in office without one being overturned. Yesterday, that changed dramatically.

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