WYSO

Senator Sherrod Brown

A standing-room crowd attended the Trotwood State of the City address Monday night.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Miami Valley officials are still awaiting word on whether the White House will issue an official disaster declaration for communities recovering from the Memorial Day tornadoes.

The designation would allow FEMA aid and other federal disaster assistance from agencies, including the United States Small Business Administration, to begin flowing to the 10 Ohio counties affected by the storm.

Among the hardest hit areas was Trotwood, where hundreds of properties remain damaged.

Jerry Kenney

United States Sen. Sherrod Brown is requesting federal funds to help Dayton recover some of the city's costs associated with security for the May 25 Klan rally. In a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, Brown wrote the city spent more than $650,000 to ensure the safety and security of people and property during, "the potentially volatile event.”

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says that while the city did not ask Brown to make the request, she's thankful for the help.

A bill in the U.S. Senate is seeking to provide more financial help for children who become victims of the opioid crisis and the families who take those children in.

The newly formed committee starts work just months after a Dayton water main break led to a massive water service outage across Montgomery County.
Kristin Stratman / WYSO

Republican Rep. Mike Turner Wednesday announced a new effort dedicated to ensuring safe drinking water in Dayton. The plan includes the formation of a new committee, which Turner told reporters will hire a national consultant tasked with completing an independent review of Dayton’s water quality standards.

The consultant is also expected to compile a list of safeguards the community may need in order to maintain good water quality in the future.

Dayton Power and Light Executive Vice President Tom Raga will serve as the new committee’s chair.

Following an exploratory tour that took him to four early voting states, Ohio Sen. Sherrod announced today that he has decided not to seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2020. Brown, Ohio's senior U.S. Senator, said he made his decision a couple of days ago. 

The 2017 Republican tax law changes are in full effect this year, and the average federal tax refund is down nearly 9 percent from a year ago. The law lowers federal withholding paychecks and increases the standard deduction for individuals, but it also takes away some deductions. And if taxpayers haven’t adjusted their withholding, they might find themselves with smaller refunds or even owing money this year. What do Ohio's senators think about this?  

Updated at 7:18 a.m. ET

Ohio Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown took a step towards a 2020 presidential campaign, announcing a tour of states holding early presidential primaries next year.

Seeking to counter President Trump's appeal to white, working-class voters that helped him flip Ohio and other key midwestern states, Brown is launching a "Dignity of Work" tour through Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

A group of activists gathered Friday afternoon outside Sen. Rob Portman’s office to encourage him to do more to end the partial government shutdown.

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown
Office of Sherrod Brown

With the polls closed across the state, the midterm election results are trickling in.

Among the first statewide contests to be decided is the race for Ohio’s United States Senate seat. 

Democratic two-term incumbent Sherrod Brown has won against GOP fourth-term Congressman Jim Renacci by a double-digit margin of around 14 points.

Renacci had campaigned with the support of President Donald Trump.

A look inside the Beacon House, a residential treatment facility in Wooster.
Dan Konik

Ohio’s U.S. Senators Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown are proposing a major policy shift for residential treatment facilities. The bipartisan proposal gets rid of the Institutions for Mental Disease exclusion, which bans any additional Medicaid funding for treatment centers with more than 16 beds.

Addiction recovery advocates say the change in Congress will help treatment centers open their doors to more people in need.

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