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recovery

Mary Duncan was one of the first people to accept a free rideshare to the grocery store from the Old North Dayton Neighborhood Association. Duncan was spending two to three hours on city buses to shop at an affordable, full-service grocery store.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

When a tornado tore through Old North Dayton on Memorial Day, one of the buildings destroyed was the neighborhood's last affordable, full-service grocery store.

The Miami Valley Long Term Recovery Operations Group says 724 individuals, families and businesses are receiving case management services.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

A coalition of organizations formed after the Memorial Day tornado outbreak gathered on Thursday to provide updates on disaster recovery progress.

The Miami Valley Long Term Recovery Operations Group says 724 individuals, families and businesses are receiving case management services. Most of those cases are in Montgomery County, according to Laura Mercer, the group’s executive director.   

“About half of those are homeowners. And about 68 percent of those homeowners have indicated that they're going to need some assistance with repair and rebuilding,” Mercer said.

FOA advocates against the stigma that often surrounds addiction
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

Dayton will soon be home to a new addiction treatment center linked to Google's parent company Alphabet. Montgomery County health advocates say the high-tech facility intends to help pioneer evidence-based research into addiction medicine.

The center is named OneFifteen, after the number of Americans who died every day from an opioid overdose two years ago.

A bill in the U.S. Senate is seeking to provide more financial help for children who become victims of the opioid crisis and the families who take those children in.

The opioid epidemic has touched the lives of thousands of people across the Miami Valley. As part of our coverage of the crisis, WYSO wanted to know what our listeners wanted to know. We collected dozens of questions, a lot of them from people wondering how best to help a loved one struggling with addiction or recovery, and how to find support for themselves.

Rebecca Thayer lives with her baby's father and friend in her first-ever apartment in Dayton.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you intimate conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid epidemic.

In this story, we meet Susan Fitzpatrick and Rebecca Thayer, mother and daughter who describe themselves as best friends. Their voices even sound remarkably alike. 

Rebecca, who friends call Becky, is 35 years old and has nearly two years clean. Before entering recovery, her drug addiction led her to a life on the streets. 

Friends Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we hear a conversation between Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd.

They first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction. 

Lori Yuppa's young son Chase Cummings died from a drug overdose
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This installment introduces us to two Loris: Lori Erion and Lori Yuppa.

The women share more than just a name. Both have had children touched by opioid addiction.

The experience led Erion to create the Dayton nonprofit Families of Addicts or FOA, to advocate, "that we are not alone," says Erion.

Sarah Clay, a 31-year-old recovering heroin addict, with three of her four children
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we meet Urbana 31-year-old Sarah Clay.

In 2007, Sarah met her husband Justin. 

“We worked together at a factory. We hit it off pretty quickly. We moved in and I was pregnant within four months,” Sarah says.

Their family grew to include four children. But everything soon changed when the couple fell deep into opioid addiction.  

A look inside the Beacon House, a residential treatment facility in Wooster.
Dan Konik

Ohio’s U.S. Senators Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown are proposing a major policy shift for residential treatment facilities. The bipartisan proposal gets rid of the Institutions for Mental Disease exclusion, which bans any additional Medicaid funding for treatment centers with more than 16 beds.

Addiction recovery advocates say the change in Congress will help treatment centers open their doors to more people in need.

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