WYSO

Premier Health

Premier Health provider, Miami Valley Hospital. Miami Valley Hospital is just one of five area hospitals operated by Premier Health,
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

In response to an outpouring of requests from people who want to do something during the COVID-19 health crisis, Premier Health has announced several ways people can help in recovery efforts.

Their first call-out is to people who have recovered from COVID-19. The healthcare organization is asking survivors to donate blood plasma — which contains antibodies that may be useful in fighting the infection in others. Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the emergency use of blood plasma.

Cars line up for drive-through COVID-19 tests at the University of Dayton Arena.
Leila Goldstein / WYSO

Hospital emergency rooms are planning for a potential spike in demand as the number of confirmed Coronavirus cases rises across the Miami Valley. Health officials say they’ll open additional emergency room beds within hours if more space is needed to handle a rapid increase in patients.

Miami Valley Hospital emergency physician Randy Marriott, EMS Medical director for Premier Health, says there’s a critical need for more masks, respirators and other special equipment to protect medical staff and keep hospitals safe and operational throughout the Coronavirus crisis.

Cars line up for drive-through COVID-19 tests at the University of Dayton Arena.
Leila Goldstein / WYSO

The University of Dayton Arena was scheduled to host the First Four today, the start of the NCAA college basketball tournament. Instead, it’s the Dayton area’s first COVID-19 testing site.

After going through a registration process, a line of cars pulled up to two testing tents, the first to rule out the flu, and the other testing for COVID-19. Only those with a physician's order and a negative flu test result are permitted to get tested for COVID-19 at the site. 

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

The redevelopment of Northwest Dayton’s Good Samaritan Hospital took another step forward this week. Premier Health and Dayton officials have announced a new nonprofit organization and board to oversee the project. The city and Premier are also contributing a combined $30 million towards redevelopment at the 13-acre hospital campus and in the surrounding area.

FOA advocates against the stigma that often surrounds addiction
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

Dayton will soon be home to a new addiction treatment center linked to Google's parent company Alphabet. Montgomery County health advocates say the high-tech facility intends to help pioneer evidence-based research into addiction medicine.

The center is named OneFifteen, after the number of Americans who died every day from an opioid overdose two years ago.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission is urging Dayton’s two major health-care systems to sign a transfer agreement with the Miami Valley’s last-remaining abortion provider.

The agreement is required by state law. And without it, the clinic is in danger of closing.

Among the city commission members, four out of five voted in favor of the resolution asking Kettering Health Network and Premier Health to sign the transfer agreement with Women’s Med Center in Kettering.

Legal efforts to challenge the state requirement have so far been unsuccessful.

Demolition of Good Samaritan Hospital has begun with the facility's former Dayton Heart & Vascular Hospital at Good Samaritan, which was established in 2009.
Jerry Kenney

Members of the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition gathered with a handful of neighborhood residents outside the former Good Samaritan Hospital complex on Salem Avenue Tuesday morning. 

The assembly was a rallying cry, meant to urge former Good Sam patients to come forth with testimony that might be given to investigators from the United States Department of Health and Human Services civil rights division when they arrive in Dayton the week of May 6.

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Investigators from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services civil rights division are expected to visit Dayton soon. Health advocates say they’ll be in town the week of May 6 to gather testimony about community health impacts related to the  closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. 

Good Samaritan Hospital shut down last year and construction crews are already demolishing parts of the complex.

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Demolitions are underway at the Good Samaritan Hospital campus, despite an ongoing federal civil rights complaint filed last spring with the United States Department of Health and Human Services over the medical facility's closure. 

An attorney for the Clergy Community Coalition, the group that filed the complaint, says an update on its status is expected soon from a federal investigator.

Premier Health outlined details of Good Sam's demolition Thursday.

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

The recent closure of Good Samaritan Hospital in west Dayton has sparked protest against Premier Health by some community residents. A coalition of westside clergy groups has also filed a federal civil-rights complaint alleging the closure is discriminatory.

And now, a new proposal at the statehouse aims to revoke Premier’s non-profit status. WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Cox Media reporter Cory Frolik about the proposed legislation.

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