WYSO

Poverty

A coalition of groups that advocates for low-income Ohioans says the state has made considerable progress in the effort to reduce poverty, but there is much more work to be done. The findings are part of the annual State of Poverty in Ohio report from the Ohio Association of Community Action Agencies (OACAA).

Tornado damage in Celina
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Cleanup from this week’s devastating tornadoes continues around the Miami Valley. More than 130 people remain in emergency shelters. Now, low-income Ohioans affected by the disaster may be eligible for temporary emergency assistance through a special Ohio Department of Job and Family Services program.

The assistance is available for qualifying low-income people affected by the tornadoes in Montgomery, Greene and Mercer counties, where Gov. Mike DeWine has declared a state of emergency.

vegetables
Alexander Baxevanis / Flickr Creative Commons

The Dayton Foodbank is reporting an uptick in new clients seeking emergency food assistance as the partial government shutdown continues into its fourth week.

Federal lawmakers recently approved a measure giving the hundreds of thousands of affected workers across the United States back pay when the government reopens, as NPR reports.

Ohio Education Policy Institute

A report commissioned by Ohio’s three major public school groups shows that state funding for K-12 education hasn’t bridged the gap between rich and poor districts, and hasn't kept pace with inflation.

It’s the first comprehensive look at state and local aid for schools since a landmark Ohio Supreme Court ruling declaring the property tax based funding system unconstitutional.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

About two dozen homeless people have obeyed a court order and cleared out of their camp on Third Street in Cincinnati. 

Many of them have taken their tents and set them up just outside the area of downtown covered by the temporary restraining order signed Monday by Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Robert Ruehlman and set up on Central Parkway/Reading Road, just across from the Jack casino. 

A city program that transformed parking meters into brightly colored charitable donations sites has announced its collection totals from its first year of operation. Real Change Dayton launched last summer to help people struggling with homelessness and cut down on panhandling.

 

Activists protest Dayton's pedestrian safety ordinance at city commission meeting held May 23.
April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is again exploring ways to ban panhandling along major city highways. At a meeting Wednesday evening, the city commission is expected to review an ordinance that would criminalize the practice.

Dayton first introduced legislation to restrict panhandling in 2011. That law required panhandlers to register with the city, and restricted begging to daylight hours. It also allowed cops to arrest violators instead of just citing them.

After legal challenges, the law was partially repealed in 2016.

Commentary: Economic De-segregation In The Miami Valley

Sep 18, 2017
Historic Breman / Flickr Creative Commons

Last summer, a nonprofit called EdBuild examined child poverty rate disparities between neighboring school districts. They then ranked neighboring school districts from largest to smallest disparities. Of the top ten largest disparities in the US, two of them were in the Miami Valley. Danielle Rhubart is a lecturer and sociologist at University of Dayton. She studies poverty in urban and rural communities and brings us this commentary - about why poverty disparity matters and how to fix it.

food in grocery store
MASAHIRO IHARA / Flickr Creative Commons

The House of Bread community kitchen in West Dayton has been feeding area residents and families in need for more than 30 years. Now, the nonprofit is close to reaching its goal in a major capital campaign aimed at expanding its existing facility.

House of Bread has already raised about $800,000 toward its overall goal of $1.4 million.

Executive director Melodie Bennett says all funds raised in the campaign will be used to expand the organization’s now-overcrowded dining room facilities.

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