WYSO

Opioid Epidemic

Federal money to fight the opioid crisis nearly doubled in the last two years, according to a national think tank’s new report analyzing that funding.

Siblings Tiffany and Jeremy started getting high together as teenagers. Now they're trying to stay clean together. They're back under the same roof at the same sober-living facility.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Around five years ago, the mother of a struggling opioid addict launched a support group in Dayton to help other people living with a loved one’s addiction.

It’s called FOA, for Families of Addicts. Central to the group’s mission is an effort to break down the stigma that often surrounds the opioid epidemic.

It’s 7:30 p.m. on a Wednesday evening, and Lori Erion is hosting a meeting of the Dayton support group called Families of Addicts or FOA.

More than 70 people gather in a big room as the meeting gets started.

The opioid epidemic has touched the lives of thousands of people across the Miami Valley. As part of our coverage of the crisis, WYSO wanted to know what our listeners wanted to know. We collected dozens of questions, a lot of them from people wondering how best to help a loved one struggling with addiction or recovery, and how to find support for themselves.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivers her 2019 State of the City Address at City Hall.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivered her State of the City Address on Wednesday morning - her sixth since taking office. The mayor’s speech tackled some of the difficult issues facing the city in the coming year.

Whaley’s more than 20-minute address began with some positives for the city. She outlined milestones reached by the city in education,business, downtown revitalization, and neighborhood investment. The mayor also talked about some of the challenges. These included the opioid crisis and the recent loss of Good Samaritan Hospital.

There’s a new anti-drug effort that involves a variety of groups from around the state. 

Gov. Mike DeWine and leaders of his program to fight opioid abuse in Ohio are meeting with local advocates from around the state to share ideas. Here are some highlights from his most recent session in Columbus.

At least one person has died after contracting Hepatitis A in Montgomery County.
Victor, Flickr CC BY 2.0, unaltered image

The state of Ohio is in the midst of a national Hepatitis A outbreak. And Montgomery County health officials are urging people to get vaccinated and take other precautions to avoid becoming infected.

At least one person has died after contracting Hepatitis A in Montgomery County.

Public health department numbers show there are more than 200 Hepatitis A cases across the county this year.

Rebecca Thayer lives with her baby's father and friend in her first-ever apartment in Dayton.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you intimate conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid epidemic.

In this story, we meet Susan Fitzpatrick and Rebecca Thayer, mother and daughter who describe themselves as best friends. Their voices even sound remarkably alike. 

Rebecca, who friends call Becky, is 35 years old and has nearly two years clean. Before entering recovery, her drug addiction led her to a life on the streets. 

Leanna Perez Green and her two sons. Perez Green's husband is retired from the Air Force. She says seeking drug treatment for her teenage son meant facing down stigma in the tight-knit Wright-Patterson military community.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO's Recovery Stories series brings you intimate conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This episode introduces us to two women whose children have struggled with addiction: Becky Walsh and Leanna Perez Green.

Leanna’s husband is retired from the Air Force. She says seeking drug treatment for her teenage son meant facing down stigma in the tight-knit Wright-Patterson military community.

Friends Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we hear a conversation between Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd.

They first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction. 

Pages