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opiate overdoses

Leanna Perez Green and her two sons. Perez Green's husband is retired from the Air Force. She says seeking drug treatment for her teenage son meant facing down stigma in the tight-knit Wright-Patterson military community.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO's Recovery Stories series brings you intimate conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This episode introduces us to two women whose children have struggled with addiction: Becky Walsh and Leanna Perez Green.

Leanna’s husband is retired from the Air Force. She says seeking drug treatment for her teenage son meant facing down stigma in the tight-knit Wright-Patterson military community.

Lori Yuppa's young son Chase Cummings died from a drug overdose
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This installment introduces us to two Loris: Lori Erion and Lori Yuppa.

The women share more than just a name. Both have had children touched by opioid addiction.

The experience led Erion to create the Dayton nonprofit Families of Addicts or FOA, to advocate, "that we are not alone," says Erion.

Opioid, The Springfield Regional Medical Center is one of 39 area collaborating hospitals and health organizations  in the GDAHA.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

In Springfield, most calls to the city’s 911 emergency switchboard are related to an opioid overdose.

Some overdose victims will die. Many others will be saved with the fast-acting overdose reversal drug Narcan.

But, for some surviving overdose victims, that’s not the end of the story. An overdose can leave behind lasting mental and physical scars, advocates say.

The​ ​drug​ ​Narcan​ ​can​ ​seem​ ​like​​ ​magic​.​ ​Just​ ​one shot​ ​of​ ​the​ ​powerful​ medicine ​can​ ​literally​ ​bring​ ​an overdose victim ​back​ ​from​ ​the​ ​dead.​

Staff at the nonprofit Springfield addiction-treatment agency McKinley​ ​Hall are participating in a new approach to opioid overdose.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Clark County has seen a record number of overdose deaths this year. But widespread use of the antidote ​Narcan is also allowing many people who overdose to survive and use again, increasing their risk of dying the next time.

To help curb overdose deaths, mental health advocates, county first responders and addiction specialists are collaborating on a new approach aimed at quickly connecting these high-risk addicts to treatment.

Drug Enforcement Administration

The federal Drug Enforcement Administration and Wright State University are teaming up to host a rally dedicated raising awareness about drug use and prevention.

The "360 Power of You” Rally taking place on October 16, 2017 at the Nutter Center is an education and outreach event on drug prevention. Organizers especially want high school students, their families, and college age students to attend the event.

DEA Special Agent, Rich Isaacson, says for the last decade his agency has worked to develop a more "holistic approach" to dealing with the opioid crises.

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

Beginning this week, Ohio, doctors, dentists and nurses will be required to follow new rules for prescribing opioid medications.

The rules include limits to opioid prescriptions for conditions such as broken bones, sprains and minor surgery to seven days for adults and five days for minors.

The changes are similar to those already enacted in a handful of other states, including Rhode Island, Virginia and New Jersey.

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

The state says the number of prescriptions being written for painkillers continues to fall as Ohio battles a deadly addictions epidemic.

Data released by the Ohio Board of Pharmacy Monday show 701 million painkiller pills were dispensed to Ohio patients last year, down 12 percent from a high of 793 million in 2012.

The data also show a 71 percent decrease in the number of patients going from doctor to doctor in search of drugs thanks to the pharmacy board's computerized reporting system.

Kasich Pushes For Integration Of Pharmacies, State Databases

Oct 27, 2015
Wikipedia/Creative Commons

Opiate overdoses were up again last year. Gov. John Kasich is responding by devoting more money to help pharmacists and doctors keep better records.

There are still pharmacists who aren’t using the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System or OARRS - a statewide database to better follow which patients have been prescribed painkillers. 

Gov. John Kasich says he wants to help these medical professionals by integrating OARRS with whatever system they already use to keep records.