WYSO

Ohio Supreme Court

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Attorneys for the Dayton area’s only abortion clinic are continuing to fight to keep the facility open, despite the Ohio Supreme Court’s refusal to hear their latest appeal last month.

The case began when the Ohio Department of Health declined to renew Women’s Med Center’s license because the clinic didn’t have a written transfer agreement with a local hospital, as required by state law. Two lower courts and the Ohio Supreme Court have all since upheld that decision. Now, attorneys for the clinic are asking the state Supreme Court to take another look.

The Ohio Supreme Court has refused to take up an appeal from Dayton’s only abortion clinic that would pave the way for it to keep operating. The Women’s Medical Center doesn’t have a transfer agreement with a local hospital as required by state law. But despite the ruling, the clinic will remain open for now.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

A judge has granted the city of Dayton’s request for an injunction, putting on hold some provisions in the recently passed state transportation budget. City officials had sued the state over the provisions reducing local state government funding by every dollar generated by red light camera ticketing programs.

Dayton argued the provisions violate the city’s established right to home rule.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

The fate of Dayton’s last remaining abortion provider may end up in the hands of the Ohio Supreme Court. Attorneys for Women’s Med Center say they’ll appeal a lower court decision that could threaten the clinic’s continued operations.

An attorney for the abortion provider says the latest court decision is not unexpected.

The Ohio Supreme Court has struck down the property-tax based funding method four times in the last 22 years. Now two lawmakers say they think they’ve finally fixed it with a new school funding formula they say is stable, customizable and transparent.

It’s been a few years, but state lawmakers are trying again to put rules on local traffic cameras, which they’ve said communities are using to generate revenue rather than improve safety. The new regulations are part of the same budget that would raise the state’s gas tax.

There may be a free lunch but there is no such thing as a free bobblehead. That’s the gist of a ruling by the Ohio Supreme Court Wednesday that the Cincinnati Reds aren’t really giving away bobbleheads to fans, but selling them.  

At issue is whether the Reds have to pay Ohio’s use tax when it purchased bobblehead dolls to give away at games. 

Ohio Supreme Court Justice Mary DeGenaro with Gov. John Kasich after announcing her appointment to the court.
Andy Chow

The Ohio Supreme Court is all Republican now that Gov. John Kasich has appointed a new justice. This comes a day before the effective date of the resignation of embattled sitting justice Bill O’Neill who stepped down to run for the Democratic nomination for governor. 

Mary DeGenaro, a judge on the Seventh District Court of Appeals, was picked to replace O’Neill. Her appointment seemed likely given she was already endorsed by the Ohio Republican Party to run for the court this year.

Flickr Creative Commons User Tengrrl

A dispute over whether to shut down Toledo's last abortion clinic is headed to the Ohio Supreme Court in a case both sides view as pivotal.

At issue in Tuesday's oral arguments is the Ohio Department of Health's 2014 order shutting down Capital Care of Toledo for lack of a patient-transfer agreement with a local hospital.

Such agreements were mandated, and public hospitals barred from providing them, under restrictions Ohio lawmakers passed in 2013. The change prompted the public University of Toledo Hospital to withdraw from its transfer arrangement with Capital Care.

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A federal appeals court is hearing arguments over the constitutionality of Ohio's lethal injection process as the state tries to start carrying out executions once again.

State attorneys say they've provided plenty of evidence to show that the contested first drug in Ohio's three-drug method will put inmates into a deep state of unconsciousness.

The state also argues that the U.S. Supreme Court last year upheld the use of that drug, midazolam, in a case out of Oklahoma.

Lawyers for death row inmates are challenging the effectiveness of midazolam.

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