WYSO

Ohio Economy

I-75 north of Cincinnati. Many in the Dayton area are living further from jobs than they did in the year 2000.   highway
Travis Estell / Flickr/Creative Commons

Traffic over the last few weeks has been noticeably lighter as Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s stay-at-home order has been in effect. But, with essential businesses still open, Ohio’s truckers continue to travel the roads getting products where they need to be, though the coronavirus threat has created some additional challenges for the men and women moving America’s goods.

The logo for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services
WOSU

Demand for unemployment benefits is skyrocketing across the state as the coronavirus continues to disrupt nearly every aspect of the economy. Last week, nearly 188,000 Ohioans filed a jobless claim, up from just over 7,000 the week before. 

The initial jobless claims dwarfs those filed during the early Eighties recession.

Nationwide, more than 3 million Americans have filed for unemployment assistance.

 UPS Store manager C.J. Pennington. The statewide stay-at-home order exempts mail, shipping, logistics and delivery busineses and services.
Jess Mador / WYSO

The streets of Fairborn were quieter than usual for a weekday afternoon and the parking lot at Kroger, often jammed throughout the last few weeks as the Coronavirus emergency has escalated, was only half full.    

Grocery stores are among the businesses designated under Gov. Mike DeWine’s "Stay at Home" order as essential, exempted from the mandatory statewide shutdown aimed at slowing the spread of COVID-19.

Emily Mendenhall and her family employ more than 50 people at two restaurants in Dayton.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Restaurants and bars across the Miami Valley are preparing for what could be an indefinite shutdown. On Sunday in an effort to slow the spread of Coronavirus, Gov. Mike DeWine temporarily banned sitdown service.

The order allows takeout and delivery to continue. And it extends unemployment benefits to affected workers without paid leave. And many business owners in Dayton’s restaurant industry are urging workers to take advantage of the help.

The new garage, under construction in the background, will also add additional mural art downtown.
Tom Stafford / WYSO

In Clark County, work is underway on a project some in the city see as critical to the long-hoped-for revival of downtown Springfield. It’s a nearly $7 million parking garage.

The garage is attracting a lot of buzz, but as WYSO Clark County reporter Tom Stafford, who also writes for the Springfield News-Sun, reports, in order for the project to succeed in promoting development, three critical elements need to be in place.

Stafford spoke with WYSO Managing Editor Jess Mador.

GM Executive Gerald Johnson announcing a new $175 million Duramax parts plant in Brookville, Ohio. The plant is expected to be operational by the end of 2020 and create 100 new union jobs in Brookville.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A new Duramax factory is coming to Brookville. The DMAX plant is part of General Motors’ stated plan to invest in $700 million in Ohio.

DMAX is a joint venture, with 60 percent owned by GM and 40 percent owned by Isuzu Diesel Services of America, Inc.

Representatives from GM and Isuzu say the new $175 million diesel engine components plant will create 100 new union jobs and should be fully operational by the end of 2020. 

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base’s workforce is aging, with roughly half of workers currently eligible to retire soon. Now, Ohio jobs, education and military officials are teaming up to attract more young people to jobs at Wright-Patt, the state’s largest single-site employer.

Around 5,000 new jobs are expected to be added at the base over the next seven years, many of them requiring advanced degrees, science, technology, engineering and math skills.

Your Voice Ohio is hosting a series of forums for community members to discuss what topics they want to see politicians and the media cover during the next election cycle.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

It was a Monday evening in a spiffy YMCA community room in suburban Springboro, Ohio, once a sleepy Shaker village, now a congested, upscale expressway exit between Dayton and Cincinnati.

About to begin was the 37th Your Voice Ohio community conversation, co-sponsored by local media in an experiment to better connect journalists with the communities they cover. Tables were optimistically set for 12 people. Only five showed up. 

The Riverside Mayor and Chamber of Commerce officials came out for a ribbon-cutting at Mad River Remedies, the first medical marijuana dispensary to open in the Miami Valley.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

The Miami Valley’s first medical marijuana dispensary held its grand opening Thursday. Mad River Remedies in Riverside offers 20 types of medical marijuana to registered patients with one of 21 state-approved medical conditions.

Riverside Mayor Bill Flaute was on hand for the ribbon cutting. He dismissed concerns about people abusing medial marijuana.

“It’s not about abuse,” Flaute says. “It’s about using it correctly and making people feel better when they’re in a lot of pain.”

EF4 tornado damage in Old North Dayton
April Laissle / WYSO

It’s been a week since the Memorial Day tornado outbreak left a path of widespread devastation across the Miami Valley and dozens of tornado-affected businesses in Greene County and Montgomery County are still struggling to resume their normal operations. City and county officials have been out canvassing hard-hit areas in an effort to assess the extent of the storm’s economic impacts.

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