WYSO

Mental Health

Federal law mandates insurers treat mental health services like they would physical health care. But the sponsors of a new bill in the Ohio Legislature say that’s not happening. 

And now, an eyewitness account of the addiction epidemic. Four decades ago, when Winkie Mitchell and Ellen Stickney began their careers, they  worked with the children of alcoholics at Clark County Mental Health Services. Before retiring as counselors, they'd also seen the children of crack, meth and opioid addicts. In this interview with WYSO Community Voices producer and Springfield News-Sun writer Tom Stafford, they share a glimpse of what they saw in those children's lives.

In rural areas, access to mental health services can be limited, sometimes even more so for teens and children. And the need for these services is growing, so one Midwestern school is using technology to help bridge this gap.

Deja'
Basim Blunt / WYSO

This week on Dayton Youth Radio we have a story from The David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center about a teenager dealing with life after a tragedy occurs. A note to listeners, this story does discuss suicide. 

My name is Deja', I'm 17 years. I'm the oldest of five kids: Ethan, Viviana. Juan Diego and Tony. I also have two dogs who are both rescues, a big dog named Roger and a smaller dog named Lily.

billboard, oregon district, tornadoes, mental health, addiction montgomery County
ADAMHS

Health officials in Montgomery County say some residents are only beginning to experience the effects of trauma from this year's Memorial Day tornadoes and the Oregon District shooting. Now, a new website aims to help people in need of assistance. And the county is getting the word out about the program through a billboard campaign. 

DeWine at a pediatric mental health conference in Dayton.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine says he expects to share the language of a gun-reform package with state lawmakers within days. The proposal would include measures the governor first discussed in the wake of the August 4 mass shooting in Dayton. 

school lockers
Brett Levin / Flickr Creative Commons

Class is back in session in many Dayton area school districts. Hundreds of students in those districts were, in some way, affected by both the Memorial Day tornadoes and the Oregon District mass shooting. 

Some districts say they are responding to students’ mental health needs, but the need for those services has already been rising in recent years.

In the Trotwood Madison City School District, 226 students were displaced by the May tornadoes. Officials say they’re seeing students with signs of trauma related to the tornado and the shooting. 

oregon district, ned peppers
Jess Mador / WYSO

A national survey conducted after last month’s mass shootings in Dayton and El Paso found more than three-quarters of Americans report feeling stressed by the possibility of another mass shooting, and a third of Americans say fear of a mass shooting, “prevents them from going to certain places and events.”

The American Psychological Association survey on stress and mass shootings, conducted online by The Harris Poll, questioned more than 2,000 people between August 8 and August 12.

Earlier this week, a State Medical Board of Ohio committee decided there wasn’t enough scientific proof that medical marijuana would help with anxiety and autism spectrum disorder. That reversed a recommendation made earlier this summer that the drug be added to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use in Ohio. But the board's change isn’t sitting well with parents who had hoped to be able to transition their autistic children off prescription drugs to marijuana. 

Gov. Mike DeWine, R-Ohio, is calling for a version of the "red flag" law, expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in response to the mass shooting in Dayton over the weekend that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

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