WYSO

Lethal Injection Drugs

The Ohio Supreme Court has added a new inmate to the execution schedule – though Gov. Mike DeWine has delayed four executions until a new way to carry them out is developed.

A federal judge says Ohio can shield the identity of people or entities involved in obtaining or using lethal injection drugs for executions.

The ruling by Judge Gregory Frost says the state's need to obtain the drugs outweighs arguments by defense attorneys that they can't meaningfully challenge the use of the drugs without the information.

The Monday decision notes that the state prison system submitted a list of people and entities that want their names shielded, meaning Ohio's request to protect names is more than speculative.

The federal government is warning Ohio not to try to bring in drugs from other countries to carry out executions.

Ohio temporarily stopped executions and switched back to the single drug sodium thiopental for future ones after the January 2014 death of Dennis McGuire, who was injected with a two drug combination and appeared to gasp and choke during his execution, the longest on record in Ohio. Sodium thiopental is in short supply in the country, so last year the state applied for a license to import it.

Renewed Effort Underway To Abolish Ohio's Death Penalty

Jul 16, 2015
Ohio House of Representatives

One state lawmaker is finding new allies in her fight to get rid of the death penalty.

State Rep. Nickie Antonio has been down this road before. The Democratic lawmaker from Lakewood has tried several times to pass a bill that would eliminate the death penalty.

“The state of Ohio needs to take the compassionate pragmatic and economically prudent step to abolish capital punishment,” Antonio said.

Judge Throws Out Ohio Inmates' Lethal Injection Lawsuit

Feb 19, 2015

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by four death row inmates who challenged a new Ohio law that shields the names of companies providing lethal injection drugs.

The inmates argue the law violates free speech rights. They sought to stop the provisions from taking effect in March.

But Judge Gregory Frost ruled Tuesday that the inmates lacked standing to challenge the law. He wrote that the law doesn't suppress speech or the ability to oppose the death penalty.