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Jobs

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base’s workforce is aging, with roughly half of workers currently eligible to retire soon. Now, Ohio jobs, education and military officials are teaming up to attract more young people to jobs at Wright-Patt, the state’s largest single-site employer.

Around 5,000 new jobs are expected to be added at the base over the next seven years, many of them requiring advanced degrees, science, technology, engineering and math skills.

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is touring the state pushing for a way to soften the blow for workers who lose their job to automation by adding requirements for companies. 

Ohio’s unemployment rate was down slightly in June. It was an even 4 percent last month compared to 4.1 percent in May. Companies in Ohio have jobs that are going unfilled right now.

Sinclair Dean of Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Anthony Ponder says the federal grant will help prepare students for high paying and relatively recession-proof employment in the manufacturing sector. 
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

With help from a federal Department of Labor grant announced Wednesday, Clark State Community College, Sinclair Community College and the Dayton Region Manufacturers Association will work together to train 365 skilled workers over the next four years, and match them with Miami Valley manufacturing employers.

Daybreak staff member, Jay Paxson tells his story of homelessness, addiction, and recovery at "In-Demand Jobs Week" presentation. Also pictured, right to left: Sandra Brasington, Alisia Clark, Helen Jones-Kelley, and Kathy Hooks.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

This week, a number of organizations are hosting events to spotlight Ohio In-Demand Jobs Week. Officials are calling it “a statewide celebration of jobs, industries and skills on-demand.” With that in mind, state and local public health advocates gathered Wednesday at the Daybreak shelter for runaway and homeless youth in Dayton. The event was centered around the importance of steady employment in helping young people get back on their feet after drug addiction.

Wilmington resident Charles Wells lost his job at DHL when the company closed its Wilmington operation in 2009.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Online retail giant Amazon is hosting employment information sessions across the Miami Valley this week. The first was held Monday morning in Wilmington, where Amazon officials say they’re looking to hire hundreds of new workers at the company's new facility at Wilmington Air Park.

The jobs sorting packages and moving cargo are expected to start at $15 an hour -- a prospect that had attracted more than two dozen job seekers by 8 a.m. 

A new report from the Ohio Chamber of Commerce says businesses it surveyed in the Buckeye State plan to hire employees despite the uncertainty of economic stability. 

The last Chevy Cruze rolled off the assembly line at the GM plant in Lordstown, Ohio, Wednesday. Workers draped an American flag over the white, four-door sedan. Now, most of the more than 1,500 workers on the last remaining shift will be laid off.

State of Manufacturing Tour held Wednesday at Staub Manufacturing in Dayton.
Jerry Kenney

U.S. Senator Rob Portman was in Dayton on Wednesday to meet with more than 20 local business leaders and state legislators about workforce development. Portman is promoting a number of measures aimed at connecting highly skilled workers with open jobs around the state.

Portman told the gathering that the workforce development gap is one of the biggest issues facing businesses across Ohio.

Two Republican state representatives will unveil legislation tomorrow to change the state’s prevailing wage law. Actually, Ohio’s lawmakers have been trying to alter those laws for a while now.

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