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Heroin

Rebecca Thayer lives with her baby's father and friend in her first-ever apartment in Dayton.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you intimate conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid epidemic.

In this story, we meet Susan Fitzpatrick and Rebecca Thayer, mother and daughter who describe themselves as best friends. Their voices even sound remarkably alike. 

Rebecca, who friends call Becky, is 35 years old and has nearly two years clean. Before entering recovery, her drug addiction led her to a life on the streets. 

Leanna Perez Green and her two sons. Perez Green's husband is retired from the Air Force. She says seeking drug treatment for her teenage son meant facing down stigma in the tight-knit Wright-Patterson military community.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO's Recovery Stories series brings you intimate conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This episode introduces us to two women whose children have struggled with addiction: Becky Walsh and Leanna Perez Green.

Leanna’s husband is retired from the Air Force. She says seeking drug treatment for her teenage son meant facing down stigma in the tight-knit Wright-Patterson military community.

Friends Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we hear a conversation between Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd.

They first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction. 

Sarah Clay, a 31-year-old recovering heroin addict, with three of her four children
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we meet Urbana 31-year-old Sarah Clay.

In 2007, Sarah met her husband Justin. 

“We worked together at a factory. We hit it off pretty quickly. We moved in and I was pregnant within four months,” Sarah says.

Their family grew to include four children. But everything soon changed when the couple fell deep into opioid addiction.  

Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor William Roberts, who works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades clean.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid epidemic. In this story, we meet Trotwood-native Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor William Roberts.

Roberts works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades clean. As Lewis explains in this story, he first met Roberts at a treatment program for struggling addicts. 

What follows is a transcript of their conversation, edited for length and clarity.

www.heroinaddiction.com

Montgomery County health officials say the number of drug overdoses is rising.

Montgomery is among seven counties across Ohio that are seeing a spike in recent drug-related emergency room visits and overdoses this summer.

The county reports that between July 26 and July 30, there has been an increase in the number of drug overdose encounters in Butler, Hamilton, Lake, Lorain, Lucas, Montgomery and Stark counties, with a total of 63 drug-related emergency room visits, 39 accidental overdoses and 24 other drug-related visits.  

Naloxone
www.drugs.com

Accidental drug overdose deaths have decreased in Montgomery County over the past few months, according to a new report from the Community Overdose Action Team task force. But, that doesn’t necessarily mean fewer people are grappling with drug addiction, officials say.

The number of Montgomery County overdose deaths fell by more than half between May and August of this year, from 80 to 38 per month.  

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

Beginning this week, Ohio, doctors, dentists and nurses will be required to follow new rules for prescribing opioid medications.

The rules include limits to opioid prescriptions for conditions such as broken bones, sprains and minor surgery to seven days for adults and five days for minors.

The changes are similar to those already enacted in a handful of other states, including Rhode Island, Virginia and New Jersey.

Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab Springfield clark county court drug evidence police sheriff jail fentnyl heroin opioids
WYSO/Jess Mador

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, along with officials from Clark County and the city of Springfield, Tuesday unveiled a new Bureau of Criminal Investigation lab in downtown Springfield.

The lab will be dedicated to testing drug evidence seized by law enforcement agencies in Clark County and statewide. Officials say it will be staffed by two highly trained and experienced drug-chemistry scientists, who will test complex combinations of drugs, including heroin, fentanyl, and other synthetic street opioids.

Heroin Fentanyl Pills
Drug Enforcement Agency

The number of opioid overdose victims treated at Greene County emergency rooms nearly doubled over one 24-hour period this week. County officials say they believe the powerful synthetic drug fentanyl is to blame.

 

Fentanyl is up to 50 times stronger than heroin and up to 100 times stronger than morphine. Greene County health officials say even small amounts of the opioid painkiller can be deadly.

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