WYSO

Health Care

Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio is tapping into the national organization’s emergency funds to be able to provide birth control and other health care services to low income women. This move allows the organization to comply with a Trump administration order that bans federal dollars from going to clinics that refer clients for abortions. 

President Trump’s administration wants the federal courts to do what Congress didn’t – overturn all parts of the Affordable Care Act. But Gov. Mike DeWine says Ohioans with pre-existing conditions don’t need to worry. 

Shortly after noon on July 19, 2018, workers stretched construction barrels and webbing across the entrance to Good Samaritan Hospital's emergency center entrance.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Demolitions are underway at the Good Samaritan Hospital campus, despite an ongoing federal civil rights complaint filed last spring with the United States Department of Health and Human Services over the medical facility's closure. 

An attorney for the Clergy Community Coalition, the group that filed the complaint, says an update on its status is expected soon from a federal investigator.

Premier Health outlined details of Good Sam's demolition Thursday.

April Laissle/WYSO

A West Dayton community group is expanding its federal civil rights complaint against Premier Health related to the company's recent closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. The organization alleges the health-care giant has engaged in a pattern of discrimination.

The Clergy Community Coalition originally filed a complaint against Premier Health with the United States Department of Health and Human Services back in May. The group argued Premier’s decision to close Good Sam would have a disproportionate impact on Dayton African-Americans.

The City of Columbus announced on Thursday it's filing a lawsuit against the Trump Administration for its treatment of the Affordable Care Act.

Hickory Medical clinic in Bellefontaine is one of Ohio's first direct primary care offices.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Dr. Ryan Kauffman is a family physician working in Logan County. He started out in a traditional medical practice, working between 100 and 120 hours a week, week after week. 

Dr. Kauffman had reached the point where he was burned out. He didn’t have time to spend with his young family. He didn’t have time to spend with his patients. So this doctor decided it was time to make a bold change that would benefit both his family, and his community.