WYSO

Food

The White House is going forward with a rule that will make it harder for Ohioans in low-income counties to get food stamp benefits. The rule eliminates the ability for states to request waivers on work requirements for counties with high unemployment rates.

Mark Kurlansky made his one and only appearance on the program to discuss his fascinating study of a substance that seems ubiquitous to us in "Salt: a World History."

Kurlansky has distinguished himself by publishing scholarly studies that are treasure troves of trivia. In the past the people who had access to large quantities of salt possessed enormous power. You can learn so much from reading this book and Kurlansky gives a great interview.

Advocates for low-income Ohioans say they’re concerned about yet another change proposed at the federal level for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as SNAP or food stamps.

Oakview Farm Meats host gatherings at the farm where diners can sample the collaboration of Hippie and the Farmer.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Pam Bowshier and Mark Runyan run the Champaign County Virtual Farmers Market together, but they also have working partnership, which they call Hippie and the Farmer. She is Hippie, the free-spirited baker; he's the conservative, 4th generation farmer. Together they've created a unique farm to table business. 

Pam Bowshier was selling her baked goods at the local farmers markets when she paired up with Mark Runyan, creating a breakfast sandwich from her bread and his sausage that people loved. 

Pam Bowsheir and Mike Runyan run Champaign Locally Grown.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

The first American farmers' market opened in Boston in 1634. They were the center of many communities until advances in modern refrigeration spawned the birth of the supermarket. In the 1970’s, Americans became more health conscious and the concept of buying fresh, locally grown produce straight from the farm caused a renaissance for farmers' markets.

Today, farmer’s markets are everywhere - even online.

For the past 30 years or so I have been a faithful reader of the New York Times. They have excellent coverage of books. During the 1980's and 1990's I was a fan of the food writer Molly O'Neill. Her culinary column in the New York Times was something I always anticipated with a sense of joy. In 1996 when Molly published a cookbook and she was coming through the area on book tour I eagerly contacted her publicist and arranged an interview.

Oregon District residents and regulars gather at Lily's Bistro, just hours after the mass shooting, to raise money for a waitress who was shot and in emergency surgery. Outside, fire and police are still cleaning the streets.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Just hours after the mass shooting that killed nine and injured dozens more, Emily Mendenhall decided to throw a fundraiser. Not some time off in the future. But right then and there.

Mendenhall is from a restaurant family that owns multiple businesses on 5th Street, where the shooting occurred. She runs Lily’s Bistro. Her brother runs Blind Bob’s, and one of the waitresses who works at Blind Bob’s, Alayna Young, was shot.

The Trump administration wants to cut food stamp benefits for about three million Americans. 

Temperatures are soaring, and that means Midwesterners are headed to summer fairs and festivals. They’ll eat plenty of high calorie foods ⁠—from corn dogs to fried ice cream sandwiches ⁠— but some festivals are trying to include healthier foods.

One of the most peculiar interviews I have ever experienced during my years hosting the program took place about 20 years ago. In those days the program aired live from our studios every weekday afternoon and the majority of my guests came out to the station to be interviewed.

I had been contacted by a fellow named Andrew Jones. He called himself "The Flying Wine Man." I had no idea what he meant by that appellation but I was about to find out.

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