WYSO

Elections

As preparations continue for the November vote, elections officials are struggling with how to allow safe access for all voters. And part of that strategy involves creating barriers.

Ohio has more of an idea about what this November’s election will look like now that the state’s election chief has handed down a directive outlining details to Ohio’s 88 county boards of elections. 

Ohio’s secretary of state says an election day with in-person voting is still the plan for this fall, but he’s suggesting some changes in case concerns about coronavirus keep voters away.  A key voting rights group agrees, but wants to go further.

The coronavirus crisis led to an order from the Ohio Department of Health that canceled in-person voting on March 17, 2020, the originally scheduled date of the state's primary election. Health Department Director Amy Acton ordered all polling locations to be closed due to a health emergency.

The state’s chief elections officer is criticizing President Trump and other key figures for sharing rumors and false information related to voting, recently about the Iowa caucuses but going all the way back to the 2016 election. This comes as Ohioans prepare to start early voting in two weeks for the presidential primary in March.

Two of the Democrats running for president have not been successful in their attempts to have their names certified to be listed on the March 17 Ohio primary ballot. One of the two has been certified to be a write-in candidate though. 

Ohio’s Secretary of State says he’ll release the list of registrations removed from voting rolls this month to various voter groups so they can re-register people on that list by the October 7 registration deadline.  And after he's dealt with that, he says he might check past voter removal lists for errors. 

Ohio’s Secretary of State is changing rules for the way political candidates designate their campaign treasurers on forms filed with his office. 

Ohio’s Secretary of State is removing more than 200,000 voter registrations thought to be improperly on the voter rolls.  But advocates for voters insist there are thousands who should not be removed.

Under this agreement between the ACLU of Ohio and Secretary of State Frank LaRose's office, those voters who have recently been removed from the rolls will be able to vote after all.

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