WYSO

Education

Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli address the crowd at Dayton Boys Prep Academy.
April Laissle / WYSO

Nearly 100 people gathered at Dayton Boys Prep Academy Tuesday to learn more about the latest efforts to turn around Dayton Public Schools. The district, which received an overall grade of “F” on this year’s state report card, is trying to avoid state takeover next year.

school desks
Historic Breman / Flickr Creative Commons

State school report card grades were mixed this year for districts in the Miami Valley. The annual report measures district performance based on test scores from the 2017-2018 school year.

Bellbrook-Sugarcreek, Oakwood, Russia, Springboro, and Wayne schools all received an overall grade of “A” on the report. “A” ratings were rare across the state this year – only 28 of Ohio’s more than 600 districts received them.

The first-of-its-kind Dayton summer camp is part of a statewide effort to spark interest in high-tech manufacturing among young people. Ohio’s industry faces a shortage of skilled STEM workers.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

For young people across Dayton, September is a time to head back to school and share stories of summer vacation. This fall, some Miami Valley students can brag about building robots … at a new manufacturing camp. The summer camp is part of an effort to spark interest in high-tech manufacturing –– Ohio’s industry faces a shortage of skilled workers. 

And, as WYSO Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds reports, organizers hope some of this summer’s crop of camp-goers will get excited about working in the field.

Jonathan Juravich, Ohio’s 2018 Teacher of the Year, explains how he meets the needs of students in his classes.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

State education leaders have a new policy they say will ensure student success.  But it involves doing some basic things many schools and teachers already do – focusing on individual students’ needs and de-emphasizing required standardized testing.

The state’s 2018 Teacher of the Year, Jonathan Juravich, helped develop the new policy that focuses less on teaching information that could be on state standardized tests and more on meeting the needs of individual students.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State’s new semester begins Monday, Aug 27. University officials are continuing to grapple with major staffing and budget issues.

 

 Some of these problems are holdovers from the last school year, when Wright State trustees announced new budget cuts were needed to prevent state financial oversight.

 

For more on this situation, and ongoing faculty union contract negotiations, WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with education reporter April Laissle.

 

red graduation caps
Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr Creative Commons

Miami Valley college students are returning to campus this fall, but for some area young people, going to college presents extra challenges because they are undocumented immigrants.

Three years ago WYSO met one such young person as part of our Graduating Latino series, a then-junior at Ponitz Career Technology Center that we called Javier who had hoped to attend college here in the Miami Valley. Today we catch up with Javier and his family. Community Voices producer Jonathan Platt visited with them and brings us this update.

Ohio Education Policy Institute

A report commissioned by Ohio’s three major public school groups shows that state funding for K-12 education hasn’t bridged the gap between rich and poor districts, and hasn't kept pace with inflation.

It’s the first comprehensive look at state and local aid for schools since a landmark Ohio Supreme Court ruling declaring the property tax based funding system unconstitutional.

Of the 600-plus public school districts in Ohio, more than three-quarters have open enrollment policies. That means they accept and educate students who live outside of their district boundaries.

Open enrollment was implemented by state lawmakers nearly 30 years ago to increase options for parents and students, an early example of school choice, but for some districts, it’s creating financial hardship and new instances of segregation.

Liberty Schools Tries to Staunch Flow of Students and Money

Facebook@askthekidwhisperer

A recent WYSO investigation revealed thousands of kindergarten through third grade students are suspended each year. State data also show school officials remove children of color from the classroom much more often than white children.

A new WYSO analysis of state education data reveals tens of thousands of students across the state are removed from school before the fourth grade for minor discipline issues.

To address these high rates, lawmakers have proposed prohibiting teachers from suspending younger students for lesser offenses. WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with producer April Laissle to learn more about the legislation.

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