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drug addiction

Friends Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we hear a conversation between Dustin Aubry and Bob Lloyd.

They first met at a meeting of the Dayton support group Families of Addicts or FOA. Aubry is in recovery from longterm addiction, and Lloyd’s adult son has an active opioid addiction. 

Lori Yuppa's young son Chase Cummings died from a drug overdose
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. This installment introduces us to two Loris: Lori Erion and Lori Yuppa.

The women share more than just a name. Both have had children touched by opioid addiction.

The experience led Erion to create the Dayton nonprofit Families of Addicts or FOA, to advocate, "that we are not alone," says Erion.

Sarah Clay, a 31-year-old recovering heroin addict, with three of her four children
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid crisis. Today, we meet Urbana 31-year-old Sarah Clay.

In 2007, Sarah met her husband Justin. 

“We worked together at a factory. We hit it off pretty quickly. We moved in and I was pregnant within four months,” Sarah says.

Their family grew to include four children. But everything soon changed when the couple fell deep into opioid addiction.  

Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor William Roberts, who works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades clean.
Maddie McGarvey / WYSO

WYSO’s Recovery Stories series brings you conversations from the heart of Dayton’s opioid epidemic. In this story, we meet Trotwood-native Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor William Roberts.

Roberts works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades clean. As Lewis explains in this story, he first met Roberts at a treatment program for struggling addicts. 

What follows is a transcript of their conversation, edited for length and clarity.

Activists protest Dayton's pedestrian safety ordinance at city commission meeting held May 23.
April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

WYSO is a partner in the Southwest Ohio Your Voice Ohio project. It's a collaborative effort to produce more relevant, powerful journalism based on the needs and ambitions of Ohioans and Ohio communities.
Your Voice Ohio

Give Ohioans time to listen to one another and they are capable of developing a plan to turn around the addiction crisis. So why isn’t it happening?

Journalists from the Your Voice Ohio media collaborative of nearly 40 print, radio, television and web news outlets met with several hundred people across the state from late 2017 well into 2018. The journalists were with the people, at the table, listening and sharing different perspectives on the crisis killing 4,000 in the state annually.

Drug Enforcement Administration

The federal Drug Enforcement Administration and Wright State University are teaming up to host a rally dedicated raising awareness about drug use and prevention.

The "360 Power of You” Rally taking place on October 16, 2017 at the Nutter Center is an education and outreach event on drug prevention. Organizers especially want high school students, their families, and college age students to attend the event.

DEA Special Agent, Rich Isaacson, says for the last decade his agency has worked to develop a more "holistic approach" to dealing with the opioid crises.

Sandra Lamb is the second person to graduate from the U-Turn Recovery Court. The first is David Key. Judge John Rudduck stands between the two in this photo.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Overdose deaths continue to rise in Southwest Ohio, and the opioid epidemic is taking a toll on courts as more and more addicts end up behind bars for drug-related crimes. To help mitigate overcrowding, some Miami Valley counties are launching special drug courts. The courts offer nonviolent addicts a chance to avoid jail and get the services they need to stay clean and out of trouble for good—but it’s no easy fix.

Sandy

Heroin Fentanyl Pills
Drug Enforcement Agency

The number of opioid overdose victims treated at Greene County emergency rooms nearly doubled over one 24-hour period this week. County officials say they believe the powerful synthetic drug fentanyl is to blame.

 

Fentanyl is up to 50 times stronger than heroin and up to 100 times stronger than morphine. Greene County health officials say even small amounts of the opioid painkiller can be deadly.

Jess Mador/WYSO

It’s no secret that Ohio’s opioid overdose-death toll continues to rise. Despite a significant drop in prescription opioids over the last few years, overdose deaths in 2015 jumped another 20 percent, and Southwest Ohio has been especially hard-hit by the crisis.

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