WYSO

Dayton Police Department

Thank you Dayton Police sign at Ghostlight Coffee
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Police officers who killed the gunman responsible for a mass shooting in the Oregon District last month were honored in a White House ceremony on Monday.

At the event, President Trump praised the six police officers, saying they displayed “nerves of steel” during the attack that left nine people dead and dozens more injured. The officers shot and killed the gunman before he could enter Ned Peppers bar, less than 30 seconds after the  attack began.

Dayton Police Lt. Paul Saunders shares new video evidence in the August 4 mass shooting.
City of Dayton

New details are emerging about the investigation into the August 4 Oregon District mass shooting that left nine people dead.

At a press conference, police shared surveillance video from area businesses pinpointing the gunman’s movements leading up to the attack.

Officials say the Dayton gunman spent time with his sibling and a friend at Blind Bob’s before heading to Ned Pepper’s bar alone. Police Chief Richard Biehl says it’s likely the gunman was casing the bar.

oregon district, ned peppers
Jess Mador / WYSO

Law enforcement authorities say the shooter in the Oregon District attack had a history of obsession with violence and had expressed a previous desire to commit a mass shooting.

Dayton Police announced Tuesday the Federal Bureau of Investigation is taking over the investigation into the 24-year-old killer’s motives in the attack that left nine people dead and more than two dozen others injured.

At a press conference, an FBI special agent from the Cincinnati Field Office told reporters there’s still a lot of evidence to go through. 

Police officers in riot gear stand on Third Street as a small Indiana Klan group rallied in Courthouse Square Saturday.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A rally by an Indiana Ku Klux Klan group in Dayton’s Courthouse Square resulted in no major problems or violence Saturday. The event drew hundreds of police officers from across the Miami Valley and the state of Ohio, and crowds of counterdemonstrators, who flooded downtown Dayton to protest the KKK.

The protestors vastly outnumbered the nine Klan members who had traveled more than 100 miles from Indiana to rally inside a fenced-off plaza in Dayton’s Courthouse Square.

Ahead of Saturday’s rally by an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group, Dayton officials are urging downtown residents, business owners and transit riders to prepare for disruptions.

Beginning Thursday, a number of streets near Courthouse Square will close to traffic, including Ludlow between Second and Fourth Streets. The intersection of Main and Third will also shut down.

Dayton Community Police Relations organizers hosted Tuesday's meeting with police commanders.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton police and community officials are urging anyone planning to counterprotest this month’s rally by an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group to take safety precautions.

More than three dozen residents met Tuesday night at the westside Boys and Girls Club of Dayton to hear about the city’s preparations and share their concerns about the upcoming so-called Honorable Sacred Knights’ rally.

Police Chief Richard Biehl told participants the department has, “done their homework and checked with other cities,” as they map out security plans for the May 25 Courthouse Square event.

The Better Dayton Coalition and Dayton Police officers updated residents about preparations for the KKK-group's rally.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Activists have released details of a plan to counterprotest an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group’s rally set for Dayton later this month.

At a forum Thursday at Mt. Enon Missionary Baptist Church, members of the Better Dayton Coalition and the Dayton Police Department urged potential demonstrators to maintain their safety and consider staying home. Dayton Public Schools officials are also asking young people to steer clear of downtown Dayton during the May 25 Honorable Sacred Knights rally.

Al-Rahman Mosque in Dayton
via Google Earth

Miami Valley Islamic leaders are calling a recent act of vandalism at a Dayton mosque a hate crime, and they’re asking local and federal officials to investigate it as such. 

A white man was captured on video throwing rocks through windows at the Al-Rahman Mosque last Thursday. Officials say the man circled the mosque several times and pointed a gun at surveillance cameras. The incident occurred around 6 a.m., a traditional Muslim prayer time.

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base was on lock down due to a reported active shooter situation. Base officials confirmed Thursday afternoon that the reports were false.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Officials at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are investigating what led to Thursday’s false report of an active shooter situation on the base. The incident caused an hours-long lockdown and prompted an emergency response from multiple government and law enforcement agencies, including a SWAT team.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

Group members allege the cameras unfairly target vulnerable communities in the Miami Valley.

The organization is aiming to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition to put the issue on the November ballot.

NAACP President Derrick Foward says the cameras disproportionately affect poor residents.

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