WYSO

Dayton Mercy Society

DMS Youth Coordinator Mehreen Raja stands in front of the doughnut and tea stand at the Dayton Mercy Society's drive-through Eid celebration.
Leila Goldstein / WYSO

This weekend, Muslims across the globe celebrated Eid al-Fitr, the festival marking the end of Ramadan. Because of the coronavirus, communities in the Miami Valley were not able to gather, hug, or eat together as usual. But the youth group at the Dayton Mercy Society (DMS) in Miamisburg dreamed up a drive-through Eid celebration.

The entrance of the Dayton Mercy Society building in Miamisburg. On Sunday the mosque will host a drive-through Eid celebration.
Dayton Mercy Society

This Sunday Muslims around the world will celebrate Eid al-Fitr, the festival marking the end of Ramadan. Muslim communities in the Miami Valley have had to adapt during the COVID-19 pandemic, with sermons conducted over Zoom and families praying at home instead of at mosques. 

In some ways, the pandemic has made Ramadan a bit easier for Chanda Haq’s family in Dayton. Her kids did not have to be in school all day or miss out on track practice because they were fasting. But she felt like something was missing this year.

Dayton Mercy Society photo

As Donald Trump takes office as the 45th president of the United States, some in Dayton’s Muslim-American community are wondering how a Trump presidency could impact them. Trump made a number of controversial statements on the campaign trail about Muslims and Muslim-Americans. These included a proposal to temporarily suspend Muslim immigration, which Trump did not specifically reiterate in his inaugural address Friday.