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Dayton Economy

Sinclair Dean of Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Anthony Ponder says the federal grant will help prepare students for high paying and relatively recession-proof employment in the manufacturing sector. 
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

With help from a federal Department of Labor grant announced Wednesday, Clark State Community College, Sinclair Community College and the Dayton Region Manufacturers Association will work together to train 365 skilled workers over the next four years, and match them with Miami Valley manufacturing employers.

EF4 tornado damage in Old North Dayton
April Laissle / WYSO

It’s been a week since the Memorial Day tornado outbreak left a path of widespread devastation across the Miami Valley and dozens of tornado-affected businesses in Greene County and Montgomery County are still struggling to resume their normal operations. City and county officials have been out canvassing hard-hit areas in an effort to assess the extent of the storm’s economic impacts.

General Motors operates a diesel engine plant in Moraine called DMAX in partnership with auto company Isuzu. It currently employs around 800 people.
WYSO

Moraine officials say they’re seeking more information about the news some General Motors jobs may be coming to the city.

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump announced these and hundreds of other new auto industry jobs as part of a new $700 million investment at GM’s Moraine, Parma and Toledo facilities.

And Moraine city officials say they’re hoping for more specifics about what to expect under the deal.

I-75 north of Cincinnati. Many in the Dayton area are living further from jobs than they did in the year 2000.   highway
Travis Estell / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is vowing to fight a provision in the new two-year state transportation budget that would penalize cities for the use of red-light traffic cameras. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine Wednesday signed the bill, which also raises Ohio’s gas tax to fund road and bridge infrastructure repairs.

The transportation budget requires cities that operate red-light cameras to report any fines the cameras generate, and for the state to deduct that income from their state aid allocations.

The city reported roughly $1.9 million in revenue from its camera program 2018.

Architect of the Capitol / United States Congress, Washington www.aoc.gov

Dayton housing officials say the government shutdown has stalled critical affordable housing development in the city.

Among the federal agencies closed by the shutdown is the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the agency that distributes funds for states' low-income housing programs, including the rental voucher program commonly known as Section 8. 

Daytonians Weigh In On How To Make The City More Vibrant

Oct 30, 2018
The Your Voice Ohio initiative brings together Ohioans from all walks of life, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.
Jess Mador / WYSO

This year, WYSO's partner project, Your Voice Ohio, has been examining how Ohio communities are thriving amid job loss, poverty, addiction, automation and other serious economic challenges.

"Almost universally – except for the Columbus metro area – counties across Ohio have experienced precipitous economic decline for two decades – some for 30 or 40 years,"  leading to steep job losses and a significant drop in quality of life, writes Your Voice Ohio's Doug Oplinger.  

The Oregon Historic District neighborhood in Dayton
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Early voting is underway across Ohio for the Tuesday, November 6 elections. With the midterms approaching, WYSO producers have been talking to would-be voters around the Miami Valley. Today, we hear from some Daytonians in the city's Oregon District about what’s on their minds this election season.

Dayton woman: I’m horrified by the current administration. The immigration policy, I think, is terrifying. The ethics, the lack thereof, nepotism, a  lot of things are terrifying.

Dayton Man: Everything with that president.

One of several houses in Miami Township in Montgomery County that had been abandoned, fallen into disrepair and declared a nuisance property.
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

About a decade ago, a housing crisis swept the country. The crash devastated many communities and changed the lives of millions of Americans who experienced foreclosure or simply walked away from homes owing more than they were worth. 

Here’s what we heard from resident's of Miami Township in Montgomery County at the time - neighbors living near vacant and abandoned houses:

"It’s very disrupting. It’s an eyesore."

"It smells like there might be a dead animal in the backyard. Honestly, there’s like a whole bunch of flies and it’s pretty nasty."

The Your Voice Ohio initiative brings together Ohioans from all walks of life, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.
Jess Mador / WYSO

The numbers just aren’t good for Ohio: 152,000 fewer jobs than in 2000, lower household income, high student debt, falling behind in education – almost every measure used to define quality of life is going in the wrong direction.

People don’t have to see the numbers – they see it in neighborhoods.

Auto parts stores, payday lenders and deep-discount stores in almost every town are evidence of cash-strapped households.

The first-of-its-kind Dayton summer camp is part of a statewide effort to spark interest in high-tech manufacturing among young people. Ohio’s industry faces a shortage of skilled STEM workers.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

For young people across Dayton, September is a time to head back to school and share stories of summer vacation. This fall, some Miami Valley students can brag about building robots … at a new manufacturing camp. The summer camp is part of an effort to spark interest in high-tech manufacturing –– Ohio’s industry faces a shortage of skilled workers. 

And, as WYSO Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds reports, organizers hope some of this summer’s crop of camp-goers will get excited about working in the field.

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