WYSO

Dayton Art Institute

Jerry Kenney

A new exhibit on display at the Dayton Art Institute pays homage to the Apollo 11 moon landing a half-century ago. The Moon Museum exhibit opened at the end of June and features some unique items.

DAI Chief Curator Jerry Smith says he’s thrilled to have the show on display in time for the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

“I’ve wanted to show this [exhibit] for a long time, and so having this opportunity and doing it where it will coincide with July 20th, the anniversary date is just perfect,” he says.

Matt Dierking organizes the Skinner Pipe Organ concerts at the Dayton Art Institute and often performs at them. A Skinner in full working order with the original pipes is a rarity these days, something akin to a Stradivarius instrument.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

One of the most interesting works at the Dayton Art Institute is a musical instrument: a pipe organ that was constructed in the Rose Auditorium 90 years ago.

It was built by Ernest M. Skinner, one of the most renowned organ makers of the early Twentieth Century.

The restoration process took years, and DAI has been celebrating by offering free concerts on select Thursday afternoons.

Dayton Art Institute
https://www.facebook.com/daytonartinstitute

As the Dayton Art Institute continues its centennial celebration in 2019, the museum's Eric Brockman and Ayn Wood visited the WYSO studios to talk with Niki Dakota about the latest exhibits on display including the newly opened Monet and Impressionis  and the upcoming summer camps beginning in July.

To learn more about events at the Dayton Art Institute, visit http://www.daytonartinstitute.org/

Our Century: Dayton Area Collects is on display now at Dayton Art Institute
Dayton Art Institute

Thousands of  revelers are expected to gather at the Dayton Art Institute Sunday to celebrate the museum’s 100th birthday.

The landmark Dayton institution has had a storied history.

It began on March 28, 1919, when a group of notable Dayton residents signed letters of incorporation to establish what was then known as the Dayton Museum of Arts. Over the next 100 years, the museum would also serve as an art school, educating generations of students, and house countless treasures and artifacts.

The Apollo XI Crew photographed by Yousuf Karsh.
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Estrellita Karsh in memory of Yousuf Karsh / ©Estate of Yousuf Karsh

The first image that comes to mind when people think of Winston Churchill is of the leader scowling, his hand on his hip. It was taken by photographer Yousuf Karsh. Some of the greatest photographs of our time were taken by the Armenian refugee who fled to North America and rose to international fame. 

"[The Churchill portrait] was the international breakthrough of his career," says Karsh's 88-year-old widow and Antioch College alumna, Estrellita Karsh, on the phone from Boston.

Richard Mosse (Irish, born 1980), Men of Good Fortune, 2011, digital c-print.
©Richard Mosse. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

At an exhibit at the Dayton Art Institute, it’s easy to pick out which of the stunning, large-format photographs belong to Richard Mosse.  The Irish artist is one of two photographers featured in an exhibition at the Dayton Art Institute that ends this Sunday called “Ravage Sublime: Landscape Photography in the 21st Century.”

Ahead of the Dayton Art Institute's Oktoberfest, Jake Kouwe of the Chardon Polka Band caught up with WYSO Music Director Niki Dakota about his band's unique brand of polka music.

The Dayton Art Institute's Oktoberfest is Saturday, September 26th and Sunday, September 27th.

Charles Phoenix celebrates classic Americana and retro culture through a variety of mediums including the presentation of found Kodachrome slides, for which his Big Retro Slideshow is named.  Phoenix also incorporates recipes and local landmarks into his show, which returns to Dayton this week. 

Charles Phoenix's Big Retro Slideshow is at the Dayton Art Institute on Thursday, November 6th.

Alex Grodkiewicz / UpDayton

Dayton’s got a problem with brain drain—young people get an education here, then leave to use those skills somewhere else. The organization UpDayton was created in part to combat that, and it’s now in its sixth year and holding a summit this Friday.

courtesy of the Dayton Art Institute

Objects of Devotion is the Dayton Art Institute's newest special exhibit.  It features over 60 alabaster sculptures that were originally displayed in homes and churches in Medieval England.  Objects of Devotion is being paired with Wings, a modern sculpture exhibition by Elizabeth Turk. WYSO's Juliet Fromholt spoke with curator Aimee Marcereau DeGalan in the gallery ahead of the exhibits' opening last week.

Objects of Devotion and Elizabeth Turks' Wings are on display now through January 5th at the Dayton Art Institute.

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