WYSO

Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce

Many Dayton businesses are struggling amid the coronavirus emergency.
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Daytonians are settling into the new normal of life during the coronavirus outbreak. Now that millions of Ohioans have been ordered to stay home, many businesses that rely on foot traffic face an increasingly uncertain future.

Gov. Mike DeWine’s Stay at Home order excludes what the state deems as essential businesses and services, such as medical care, food, shipping, and deliveries.

The exemptions were welcome news for C.J. Pennington, who manages a UPS Store in Fairborn.

EF4 tornado damage in Old North Dayton
April Laissle / WYSO

It’s been a week since the Memorial Day tornado outbreak left a path of widespread devastation across the Miami Valley and dozens of tornado-affected businesses in Greene County and Montgomery County are still struggling to resume their normal operations. City and county officials have been out canvassing hard-hit areas in an effort to assess the extent of the storm’s economic impacts.

Matt Grubb, 24, recently started his own process-serving business delivering documents for some Dayton law firms.
Akram Akram / WYSO

A recent Dayton survey finds nearly a third of Daytonians aged 18 to 34 are “totally unlikely” to remain in the city for the next five years. A new initiative aims to reverse this trend by matching more college students with Miami Valley internships.

Advocates hope connecting young people to jobs early on could boost the chances they’ll stay and start careers in Dayton down the road.  

WYSO

Republican Congressman Mike Turner of Ohio’s 10th District says his investigation into operations at the National Aviation Hall of Fame will continue. Turner on Monday announced his intentions in a letter sent to NAHF board of trustees chairman Bill Harris.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The constitutional amendment that would legalize marijuana in Ohio will appear on the ballot for this fall, after organizers made up for an earlier shortfall in signatures.

A coalition of Dayton-area businesses and law enforcement, calling itself Dayton Regional Employers Against Marijuana or DREAM, has come out against it.

The Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce surveyed its members and found that almost 70 percent are against the proposed constitutional amendment.

Businesses Get On The Common Core Bus

Aug 25, 2014
School bus
schoolfreeware / Openclipart

Business and education groups are expected to be in Columbus this week to defend the state’s Common Core curriculum in house hearings.

House Bill 597 would repeal the K through 12 educational standards, which are set to go into effect this school year—opponents see the standards as federal overreach. But business groups like the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce have been on board ever since Ohio passed its version of the standards in 2010.

Pointal / Openclipart

Small businesses around Ohio are struggling to sort out the details of the Affordable Care Act, and it’s unclear whether recent delays in the law help or hurt the confusion.

The big Obamacare question for small employers is this: “Am I required to provide health insurance to my employees, or not?”

Logistics Jobs Expected To Grow In Dayton Area In 2014

Feb 10, 2014
kebe / Openclipart

State and local leaders are pushing to grow the logistics and transportation industries, particularly around the I-70/I-75 interchange, with one major new project already under construction west of the Dayton International Airport.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for January 27, 2013 including the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney speaks with Jason Antonick from the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce about new business filings in the Miami Valley.

-PoliticsOhio: What Air Force Cuts Mean For Miami Valley, by Emily McCord

Last week we reported that state officials saw the number of new business filings in Ohio as a positive sign of economic growth for the state.  Applications to do business in Ohio last year reached more than 88,000.  

Although most officials will tell you that the economy is far from where it needs to be in terms of a full recovery, business leaders say there are a number of positive signs for our state and local economies.  Jason Antonick is Manager of Business and Economic Development at Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce.

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