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(from left) FBI special agent Joseph Deters, U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Former Dayton City Commissioner Joey Williams has been convicted in connection with an ongoing federal corruption probe. He pleaded guilty Friday to bribery charges in United States District Court.

Williams was indicted earlier this year for accepting a construction project at his home in exchange for influence over the awarding of city contracts.  

He’s expected to be sentenced January 29.

Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court won't hear an appeal by Montgomery County seeking immunity in a wrongful death lawsuit involving an inmate who died in 2012 during a medical emergency.

The Dayton Daily News reports attorneys for the county's insurance company sought the protection, previously denied by a U.S. District Court judge.

Robert A. Richardson Sr. died May 19, 2012. Attorneys for his estate allege jail employees improperly handcuffed and subdued the 28-year-old man after his cellmate sought assistance. The lawsuit said Richardson was "essentially crushed to death."

marijuana leaves
Statehouse News Bureau

The City of Dayton is asking voters to consider a ballot initiative next Tuesday. The measure would decriminalize certain misdemeanor offenses for marijuana and hashish. City officials are calling Issue 8 an “advisory election.” If voters approve the measure, it simply means that the city would be free to consider amending Dayton law.  

Passage could open the door in the future to decriminalizing certain misdemeanor marijuana and hashish offenses. The move would require city officials to make changes to the Revised Code of General Ordinances.  

 

SalFalko / Flickr Creative Commons

Even though judicial races are considered nonpartisan in Ohio, judicial campaigns are usually funded with campaign contributions. A government watchdog group’s report says once they’re on the bench, judges don’t recuse themselves when hearing a case involving those donors. 

The 2014 shooting of John Crawford sparked protests across the Miami Valley. In this photo, a group calling itself the Groovy Grannies organized a demonstration against police violence in Springfield.
Wayne Baker / WYSO

New testimony from an expert witness appears to implicate the police officers involved in the shooting death of John Crawford III at a Walmart store in 2014. The statement emerged as part of the Crawford family’s ongoing civil suit against the Beavercreek police department and the Walmart company. But, the family’s attorney says the development is unlikely to trigger a new criminal investigation into Crawford’s shooting.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

An Ohio village ordered to pay back $3 million in citations stemming from automated traffic cameras is taking its case to the state Supreme Court.

 The Hamilton-Middletown Journal News reports New Miami has asked the Ohio Supreme Court to hear its appeal. Lower courts have ruled that New Miami isn't immune to legal action because it gained funds by collecting fines under a traffic camera program that was declared unconstitutional in 2014.

The village argues sovereign immunity is guaranteed to municipalities across the state and necessary for preserving "fiscal integrity."

John Crawford III
Tressa Sherrod via Facebook

An Ohio city has spent over $430,000 defending two officers in connection with the fatal police shooting of a man at a Wal-Mart who was carrying an air rifle from a store shelf.

The Dayton Daily News reports the cost to the Dayton suburb of Beavercreek includes about $210,000 paid to two law firms.

The city's law director says outside counsel was necessary. Crawford family attorney Michael Wright says the money could have gone toward a settlement for the family.

The Ohio Supreme Court has adopted an administrative rule that would restrict the use of shackles on juveniles during court proceedings.
 
The amendment to court rules would require judges to begin with the premise that shackles aren't needed.
 
Judges could restrain juveniles on a case-by-case basis if a judge deems their behavior a threat or they're at risk of fleeing. The judge also would have to determine whether less restrictive alternatives exist.
 

Judge To Resign As College Trustee In Ethics Deal

Dec 18, 2014

A federal judge is resigning his seat as an Ohio State University trustee to resolve an ethics investigation over his job teaching at the university's law school.

An agreement with the state Ethics Commission calls for Judge Algenon Marbley to leave his seat next month and also teach law classes without pay in the spring and fall semesters.

The agreement made public Thursday resolves an investigation into whether Marbley violated state law by teaching at a university where he also serves as a trustee.