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John Kennedy / Flickr Creative Commons

Late winter is the anteroom to early spring, growing the birdsong, rousing small mammals to courtship, drawing the first bulbs from under the snow.

Now comes the close of winter berryfall: the red honeysuckle berries have long ago fallen or been taken by birds. The orange fruit of the evergreen euonymous vines and the bittersweet vines has completed its planting. Overwintering robins eat and seed the crab apples.

An evening with Leslie Uggams is tonight at 8:00pm at The Victoria. It is a launch of Wright State's Musical Theatre Initiative and Ms. Uggams will sing classic and contemporary standards.

The Cincinnati Reds Caravan is arriving to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Saturday, from 11am to 2pm. You will meet members of the Cincinnati Reds including All-Star third baseman Todd Frazier, manager Bryan Price, broadcasters Jim Day and Jeff Piecoro, and mascot Mr. Red.

Sam Leech / Flickr Creative Commons

By the end of January, deep winter moves to its close, and late winter is carried into the nation by the lengthening days and the relentless south winds that always follow each cold spell.

The sun approaches a declination of 19 degrees on the 25th, putting it at its mid-November noontime height, and marking more than 20 percent of the way to spring equinox.

The Muse Machine Theater is happening right now and they are doing Oliver! The most talented young performers across this area are performing. You will hear family favorites like  “As Long as He Loves Me” and “Consider Yourself.” This is this weekend at The Victoria Theater.

John Winkelman / Flickr Creative Commons

Now when the nation lies exactly in the middle of its peak snow period and average temperatures are the lowest of the year, then the advance of spring quickens, and the night starts contracting by two to three minutes each day all the way into June. Crows know all about the expanding daylight. Their migration cycle typically starts at the early edge of the night’s retreat. Junco movement begins in mid-January, too, just as the sun comes into Aquarius.

A young man with his bicycle, fresh from cross-country travel, shows up at the Greenwich Village door of his 91-year-old grandmother. She takes him in. Soon we see the awkward, sometimes funny way they try to connect and help each other. 4,000 Miles is a new play at the Dayton Theater Guild and it opens tonight.

Rebecca Stanek / Flickr Creative Commons

In some ways, nothing seems to change within the center of Deep Winter. Still, what may appear to be the status quo is actually transformation – and its pieces measure the progress of Earth toward equinox.

Last year’s plants, are all giving way to the weather, leading the land back toward the sun. The hulls of last June’s sweet rockets and August’s wild cucumbers are empty, brittle and delicate like shed snakeskin. Asters and boneset seeds are gone. Milkweed pods are stained and empty.

Andrea Marutti / Flickr Creative Commons

One of the easiest ways to get a little control over winter is to count the major cold fronts that reach your house between now and the middle of February (when earliest spring often arrives along the 40th Parallel). See how many of those cold fronts you can record on your calendar. If you have a barometer or thermometer, you can follow them by making graph of ups and downs! Or you can cheat by checking the Internet.

Driving Electric

Dec 29, 2014

“Electricity is the thing ... no whirring and grinding gears …  no water-circulating system to get out of order — no dangerous and evil-smelling gasoline and no noise.”  That’s what Thomas Edison said about electric cars over a century ago.  University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha and some of his colleagues have been taking this to heart.  Here’s Bob with some thoughts on driving electric.

blmiers2 / Flickr Creative Commons

“We live in memory, and our spiritual life is at bottom simply the effort of our memory to persist, to transform itself into hope…into our future,” states the philosopher, Miguel de Unamuno.

Of course, once you have uncovered the span the year's cycle, you can see the past and tell the future. Stasis and passage become inseparable. Awareness of landmarks in the seasons encompasses not only what was but what still may be.

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